Tag Archives: dairy free

Hemp Heart Porridge and More Good Fats to Try 21 Days from SAD to Well Fed

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21 Days from SAD to Well Fed Day #3

Day #1 here         Day #2 here

Have you tried hemp lately? It’s not just for making macrame plant hangers or eco-friendly clothing. It’s not something you smoke in the back of your psychedelic VW van either.

Hemp has a long and interesting history in world civilizations. According to this historian hemp has been in cultivation for 8,000 years. Its usefulness encompasses a wide range from paper, rope, clothing fiber and sail canvas; to food for humans and animals; to medicines for childbirth, dysentery and rheumatism.

Grown around the world from east to west this plant’s history is intertwined with man. Beginning in China around 2800 BC and making its way to North America by the 1600s where Thomas Jefferson and George Washington grew it on their farms, hemp is one of the oldest known cultivated plants. The sails of the Mayflower and the original Levis jeans were made from hemp cloth.

Hemp Hearts

Hemp seeds, or hemp hearts as they are often called, are full of healthy fats just like many other seeds and nuts. High in omega-3 fats and GLA (a special fat your body uses to make hormones), hemp seed can be useful in fighting inflammation and nourishing the immune system.

(Fun fact if you raise chickens – feeding hemp hearts to your chickens will increase the omega-3 in their egg yolks!)

Also amazing about hemp – it is one of the very few plant foods containing complete protein, meaning all of the necessary essential amino acids needed for a healthy diet. That plus a healthy dose of fiber and many key vitamins, minerals and trace nutrients make hemp seeds something worth trying!

Low Carb Hemp Heart Breakfast Porridge

This hemp heart porridge recipe is filled with healthy fat and plenty of fiber as well as inflammation-fighting spices.  It’s also vegan, gluten-free, low carb, and dairy-free.

Start with a base of full fat coconut milk and hemp seeds, then add in more superfood seeds like chia, sesame, sunflower, pumpkin, and flax. Give it an anti-inflammatory kick with cinnamon, ginger, turmeric, cardamom and black pepper. Stir in some stevia for a little sweetness and simmer for a few minutes to make a hearty hot breakfast.

(A note about flax: Always buy whole flax seed and then grind it just before using. Flax oil is very unstable and will begin to go rancid within just a few hours of grinding the seed. I use a little spice grinder like this.)

A few more add-ins that aren’t vegan, but are worth trying include grassfed gelatin or collagen powder, and a drizzle of raw heavy cream just before serving. I also like to add MCT oil for a brain boost.

Hemp Heart Porridge
 
Author:
Recipe type: breakfast low carb
Serves: 1 serving
Cook time:
Total time:
 
Healthy fats have the starring role in this hearty breakfast bowl. If you don't have all the seeds listed, just use what you have. The base of hemp and chia make a great foundation for any combination of nuts and seeds you like.
Ingredients
  • ¾ cup full fat coconut milk
  • 3 Tablespoons hemp hearts
  • 2 Tablespoons chia seed
  • 2 Tablespoons shelled sunflower seed or shelled pumpkin seeds
  • 2 teaspoons sesame seeds
  • 1 Tablespoon flax seed, freshly ground
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon ground turmeric
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cardamom
  • ⅛ teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • pinch of salt
  • stevia powder or drops to taste
  • 1 teaspoon MCT oil
  • 1 Tablespoon grassfed gelatin or collagen powder (optional)
  • toasted pecans or walnuts for topping (optional)
  • heavy cream for topping (optional)
Instructions
  1. Pour the coconut milk into a saucepan.
  2. Add in the hemp, chia, sesame, sunflower, pumpkin or other seeds.
  3. Add the cinnamon, ginger, turmeric, cardamom, pepper, vanilla and pinch of salt.
  4. Sprinkle on the gelatin or collagen if using.
  5. Heat on the stove over medium-low heat, stirring, until the mixture begins to bubble around the edges.
  6. Stir in the stevia and continue simmering for 3 to 4 minutes, stirring frequently.
  7. When the mixture reaches a thickness you like, remove from heat and stir in the ground flax seed and the MCT oil.
  8. Pour into a serving bowl and top with any optional toppings such as toasted nuts or heavy cream.

 

How will you enjoy your hot hemp porridge?

 

Plantain Pancakes (GF/DF)

plantain pancakes title

So I was driving from Orlando up to Georgia to pick up my kids after a weekend with their grandparents, and I was listening to a podcast with Chris Kresser (functional and integrative practitioner and author of Your Personal Paleo Code).  His co-host was asking him what was for breakfast that morning. Chris started describing these plantain waffles he’d eaten and I just started salivating – I love plantains, green or ripe, and they also happen to be a really good carb for just about anyone – so I decided I would look for that recipe when I got home.  I bought two nicely mottled-brown plantains at the store and then checked out Bing for the recipe.  I was pretty bummed when all I could find were recipes using plantain flour instead of just ripe plantains. But that didn’t stop me for long, because after all of the GAPS cooking, gluten-free cooking and Paleo cooking I’ve been doing lately I can pretty much make a pancake out of anything; maybe not a waffle, but definitely a pancake.

plantain vs banana

plantain vs. banana

If you’ve never had a plantain, they are similar in appearance to a banana, but a good bit larger. When you cook them green they taste a lot like potato. When you wait until they are nearly black all over and kind of squishy you can bake them or slice and fry them in butter or ghee for a sweet, warm, caramelized tropical treat.

For the pancakes I peeled the riper of the two plantains and cut it into chunks and stuck it in the blender.  I added two Lake Meadow eggs, a 1/2 cup of full fat coconut milk, aluminum-free baking soda, sea salt and a little coconut flour and blended it all up until it was smooth.  A little coconut oil on the hot griddle and it was time to see if it worked.

plantain pancake cooking on griddle

the bubbles will tell you when it’s time to flip it over

One thing about non-traditional pancakes is they are sometimes tricky to flip. I waited for the classic signs of pancake flipping readiness….little bubbles that form all over the batter then pop and stay popped.  After one fail (still tasty, but not really a good pancake shape) I discovered I needed to be swift and confident making the metal spatula scoop and flip in one quick movement.  A few seconds to finish the other side and then onto the plate.  I used a 1/4 cup of batter per pancake and got about 8 pancakes. Slathered with some Kerrygold butter they didn’t need anything else in my opinion.  My husband enjoyed a little raw honey on the one I saved for him. These are good hot or cold. I could see them used as a wrap for some nut butter and jam, or maybe with a little sliced ham.  I enjoyed them stacked on a plate hot off the griddle.

Plantain Pancakes (GF/DF)
 
Author:
 
Naturally sweet these pancakes are high in protein, good fats and good carbs.
Ingredients
  • 1 ripe plantain
  • ½ cup coconut milk
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • ¼ tsp sea salt
  • 2 eggs, preferably from pasture raised hens
  • 1 Tblsp coconut flour
  • coconut oil or butter for the griddle
  • any toppings such as butter, fresh berries, or raw honey
Instructions
  1. Preheat a griddle on medium-high heat.
  2. Peel the plantain, cut into chunks and place in a blender.
  3. Add the remaining ingredients into the blender and blend on high speed until smooth.
  4. Grease the griddle with a little coconut oil and pour the batter onto the hot griddle using approximately ¼ cup batter or less per pancake.
  5. Cook until bubbles appear on the batter that do not disappear when they pop.
  6. Quickly turn the pancakes over to finish cooking the other side, about 1 minute or less.
  7. Serve hot or cold with desired toppings.

 

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