Tag Archives: Traditional Cooking School

The Four Rs of Conservation: Reduce Reuse Recycle Rot

Four-Rs-of-Conservation-Traditional-Cooking-School-GNOWFGLINS-mainThis blog is part of my contribution to Traditional Cooking School

“Stewardship is foundationally understanding that we are not owners of things, but managers. It basically boils down to three major points:

1. God owns it all.
2. We are all stewards.
3. We have a responsibility to manage it for His glory.

If we understood these pieces, we would do things differently and everything would fall into place.”

–Chris Goulard, Pastor of Stewardship at Saddleback Church

“The care of the Earth is our most ancient and most worthy, and after all, our most pleasing responsibility. To cherish what remains of it and to foster its renewal is our only hope.”

–Wendell Berry

Eating local, eating real, and eating organic is a great start, but it’s just the start — on a long path to helping clean up our planet. Just like everything else, it’s a journey beginning at your own front door. Here are a few ideas to help you Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, and Rot in your own home, neighborhood, and town…Read More

Cajun Catfish and Homemade Cajun Seasoning

Cajun-Seasoning-and-Catfish-Traditional-Cooking-School-GNOWFGLINS-main2-jpgThis post is one of my regular blogs for Traditional Cooking School:

The Acadians began as French settlers of a region called Acadia — in eastern Canada and northern Maine — but they eventually traveled down the Mississippi River in the 1750s to escape difficult British rule. Near the end of that long river, the Spanish finally welcomed them in what would become Louisiana.

The Acadians settled down and got cooking, developing some of the tastiest food anywhere. Étoufée, boiled crawfish,  gumbo filé, and fried catfish became trademark dishes for these folk, whose name was soon shortened to just Cajuns.

Cajun food focuses on local ingredients found in the bayous and river delta, and (unsurprisingly) their menus feature fish and seafood quite often. In addition to the traditional French mirepoix (diced onion, carrot and celery), the Cajuns like to add garlic, cayenne pepper, and plenty of black pepper to make zesty, full flavors.

Although their basic seasoning combination is…. (You can read the rest here)

Leave me a comment here or at Traditional Cooking School and let me know your favorite way to eat catfish!