Tag Archives: Sunday Social

Sacred Fat

This blog post is a product of a lot of studying and thinking for a long period of time. Amy and I have talked extensively about it, she’s texted, emailed and phoned me back with random thoughts, Bible verses and other ideas as they’ve occurred. I’d like to write something more detailed eventually, but I think it’s important to write something now.

caravaggio sacrifice of Isaac

Caravaggio Sacrifice of Isaac

Ok, it started with the word Sacrifice.  Defined as the act of offering to God something precious; or the item itself that is being offered; it is also the surrender of something for the sake of something else – something given up or lost.  So something is only a sacrifice when it is meaningful, when there is hardship involved, and when we do it for a greater purpose.  It is important to get that definition of sacrifice in your head, let it sink in.  It’s not really a sacrifice unless what is being given up is something precious.

It is this misunderstanding of sacrifice that I did not fully comprehend and therefore I was able to have this disconnected view of scripture vs. what I personally was doing and what I believed.  Growing up in the 70s and 80s I remember the legendary Time Magazine cover with the eggs-and-bacon frowning face, I memorized the food pyramid with the “fats and oils sparingly” near the top. I bought things because they were fat-free, I tried to drink skim milk (and decided that no milk was better than skim milk – gag!).

Not fully getting the depth of what a sacrifice actually is made it so hard for me when I would read from Exodus or Leviticus about all of the sacrifices required from the Israelites.  Like this one from Exodus 29 “take from this ram the fat, the fat tail, the fat on the internal organs, the long lobe of the liver, both kidneys with the fat on them, and the right thigh…it is the ram for the ordination…burn it up…it must not be eaten, it is sacred.”  Or this one from Leviticus 3 “from the fellowship offering you are to bring a food offering to the Lord: its fat, the entire fat tail cut off close to the backbone, the internal organs and all the fat that is connected to them, both kidneys with the fat on them near the loins, and the long lobe of the liver, which you will remove with the kidneys.”

I mean really, why is there such detail? And why specifically those parts? I remember reading those passages years ago and thinking God wanted all the gross stuff and he left all the normal bits for the Israelites, He’s such a benevolent Lord letting them keep the steaks and the chops while he took the fat and the liver.  But if that were true, it wouldn’t be much of a sacrifice now would it?

butter and sliceIt took me a long time to get it, and it wasn’t until I read about Dr. Price’s villagers in his book Nutrition and Physical Degeneration, and about how many of those cultures had sacred foods, that these thoughts began to take shape.  I read about the Swiss villagers in the Loetschental Valley who filled a bowl with the deep orange-yellow butter made from the cream of the cows eating the fresh, green grass of spring. They would place a candle wick in this bowl of vitamin-rich butter, light the wick and place it in a sanctuary specially built just to honor God for giving them this precious food that gave life and health to their village. Native American Indians in northern British Columbia would hunt moose, and after killing one the very first thing they would do would be to open it up, and in the back of the moose just above the kidney would be two balls surrounded by fat. They would remove these and cut them up into as many pieces as there were people in their family and each person, child and adult, would eat his piece. These two fatty bits were the adrenal glands of the moose which we now know are the richest source of vitamin C in all animal or plant tissues.  Natives living on islands near the Great Barrier Reef would purposefully attract sharks and then dive in after them armed with pointed sticks, to slip coconut fiber ropes over the sharks’ heads and pull them to shore because sharks livers were a vital part of the foods they needed to stay healthy.

Learning about all of these people all around the world who put forth so much effort just to have certain foods I began to understand something. All of these highly-valued foods were similar to the very items called for in the sacrifices of the Israelites that I was having such a hard time understanding.

Unger’s Bible Dictionary tells of a breed of sheep raised during Bible times in the Middle East bred to have a particularly luscious and fatty tail. This tail and its rich fat were forbidden to be eaten if the animal was part of a sacrifice offered to God. Also forbidden to be eaten was the fat from around the stomach, entrails and kidneys – all of the richest parts from which we would use nowadays to make high quality tallow. Unger’s goes on to explain that the fat was the richest part of the animal and stood for healthfulness and vigor.

In my past readings of scriptures about sacrificial laws I was approaching it with a modern worldview brainwashed by the government agencies dictating diet advice that condemned fat as bad, said organ meats were dangerous, and told us to eat lean meats instead.  I should have trusted God instead of buying those lies. Isaiah 55 says “Listen, listen to me and eat what is good, and you will delight in the richest of fare….For my thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are your ways my ways declares the Lord. As the heavens are higher than the earth, so are my ways higher than your ways and my thoughts than your thoughts.”

Because of Dr. Price’s writings, and because of the work of Sally Fallon Morell in Nourishing Traditions, I understand that organ meats are superfoods full of vitamins crucial to health; I know that the fats from grazing free-range animals are rich in vitamins that work as activators for the minerals and other nutrients we eat. I’ve learned these fat-soluble activators are essential to maintaining fertility, growth and health in all humans. And now I understand that God was truly asking for a sacrifice, something that would have been a real hardship to nomadic people whose very life depended on the animals they herded. God commanded them to give to Him the most valuable parts of the very best animals they owned.  The Bible, especially the Old Testament, is filled with expressions using fat to represent something wonderful – “the fat of the earth”, “the fat of the wheat, of the oil, and the wine,” even “the fat of the mighty”.

burnt-offeringNot only were the Israelites called to sacrifice these choicest of parts, but then they would burn the fat on the altar with fire.  Just imagine the aromas that would release – the Bible calls it a “sweet savor unto the Lord”, but anyone who has smelled grilling hamburgers, steaks, or even better, pit barbecue, can attest to the mouthwatering scents that fill the air around those events.  The sacrifices of precious fat and organ meats given over to God on the fire of the altar were the way man could show his complete surrender to God, to show his heart was pure and ready to be obedient. And when a different animal was slaughtered destined to become food rather than sacrificed, the fat, organ meats and choicest bits would be even more appreciated knowing that they were good enough to be given to the Lord.

There’s so much more to say, more directions to go with these thoughts – how did we end up on the road to thinking fat was bad? Why did we think we could improve on fat by making trans fats, fake fats and industrial fats? When we are poor stewards of God’s creatures feeding them foods they were not created to eat, making them live in ways they were not meant to live why are we shocked to learn their fat (and meat) no longer provides what we need?  But I need to stop now. I’m very interested to hear your thoughts, to find out if this has sparked an “aha!” moment for you, too, like it did for me. Please leave a comment by clicking on the “leave a reply” link next to this article!

I’m linking this up with the Easter Sunday Social.

Sunday Social Blog Hop

Sunday Social Blog Hop

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Sunday Social Blog Hop for Easter Sunday April 20, 2014

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Welcome!

What Is The Sunday Social Blog Hop?

A virtual “Sunday Social”, where we all gather together and share good food recipes and be an encouragement to one another with articles of spiritual and inspirational nature. Come join us, submit YOUR articles, browse around and visit a site or two and learn some new recipes and be encouraged!

This Blog Hop is being hosted by:

Simply Natural Network

Kat @ Simply Living Simply

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Lee @ Well Fed Family

Sara @ The Granola Mommy

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Pam @ Thankful Expressions

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Angela @ Grassfed Mama

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All of your wonderful tried-and-true family favorite food recipes AND Inspirational/Spiritual/Religious encouragement type posts!

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By linking up! Our featured blogger is chosen each week at random by our Co-hosts…and we hope to have YOU as our next featured blogger!

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**Please note: By linking to this Blog Hop you are giving us permission to link back to your post if you are featured. We will also include 1 photo from your post in the interest of sending visitors your way. So you don’t miss a single Blog Hop, we will also add you to our e-mail reminder list. For a little extra exposure/marketing BONUS, we will also “PIN” your submissions on our PINTEREST Board-HOP on over and check that out….HERE! Just a quick reminder: All posts are welcome, however let’s keep them uplifting, encouraging, respectful and kind…otherwise they may be removed**

Congratulations to our Featured Bloggers:

Inspirational/Spiritual:

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Recipes:

Taylor Made Ranch

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MYO Thousand Island Dressing In Minutes

Let the blogging begin…

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Synergy and Our Body’s Balancing Act

Synergy happens when many parts come together to make a whole that is even greater than the simple sum of the individual elements.  In the Bible book of 1 Corinthians 12 the apostle Paul talks about a kind of synergy in the body of Christ’s believers. Paul uses the human body as his example when he says “the body is not made up of one part but many.”  One part is not more important than another, and all parts no matter how seemingly insignificant are necessary to the body. Paul wrote “The eye cannot say to the hand, ‘I don’t need you!’ And the head cannot say to the feet, ‘I don’t need you!’ 22 On the contrary, those parts of the body that seem to be weaker are indispensable,”  Just like the parts of the body work synergistically to make a living, breathing person so do the various nutrients work within our bodies.

Wander down any grocery aisle and you’d likely think that some nutrients were more important than others. “Calcium Fortified!” is plastered across everything from orange juice to chocolatecalcium fortified Orange Juice syrup.  Skim milk, breakfast cereals and margarine carry boldface letters announcing  “Added vitamin D!” The truth is that no single nutrient is more important than another. Just like our feet must cooperate with our toes, our legs and our brains in order for us to walk or run, so must the nutrients we get from our diet work together to keep us strong and healthy.

Vitamin A is crucial for eyesight and a healthy immune system, but taking too much vitamin A on its own over time can be toxic. Vitamin D is critical to life,  guiding the body to make strong bones and a calm, healthy nervous system.  Taking megadoses of Vitamin D over time can also be toxic. But together, when vitamins A&D are present and balanced within the structure of a healthy, nutrient-dense diet, they work synergistically to protect against toxicity.  Look at calcium: Taken on its own in large doses calcium can actually cause osteoporosis and atherosclerosis. This is called the “calcium paradox”. Balance the calcium with magnesium, along with Vitamins D&K2, and you stop the toxicity.

Chris Masterjohn PhD, a researcher with the Weston A Price Foundation, says that we need to take the focus away from trying to achieve a particular concentration of any single vitamin in our bodies and instead realize that ALL of the fat soluble vitamins are important. Eating a good diet, such as the one recommended by Dr. Weston Price, insures that you have balanced levels of all the nutrients allowing for synergistic action between the nutrients.

Dr. Kate Rheaume-Bleue explained this nutrient synergy like a team of gymnasts working together to put on fancy balancing acts, but if one team member lets go the whole pyramid collapses on the ground.  Dr. Kate says that the fat soluble vitamins team up with the mineralsgymnastic balancing act like calcium and magnesium. Working together the vitamins make sure the minerals go where they are needed instead of ending up in a place where they would do harm. She notes that 50% of all heart attack victims have cholesterol levels considered normal or desired. Instead of using cholesterol levels to predict heart disease Dr. Kate suggests testing for the presence of calcium in the coronary arteries, meaning the synergy with A, D, K2 and calcium has broken down.

You also need to know our bodies can’t store vitamin K2. We have to eat it every day or we won’t have enough of it and it won’t be in balance. Unfortunately most people don’t eat the right kind of food anymore to get K2. Industrial farming and CAFOs deplete K2. Trans fats block K2!  Animals produce K2 only as long as they are eating grass and other green foods rich in K1. Then we can get enough K2 by eating their milk, eggs and organ meats. Fermented foods help us produce K2.  Foods with higher levels of K2 include Natto, cheese, egg yolks, butter, chicken liver, salami, chicken breast and ground beef.

Finally, it’s not just the vitamins that work together; fat is also important.  Fat is what allows the fat-soluble vitamins to be absorbed and used. Vitamin E and fat increase our absorption of vitamin A.  According to Chris Masterjohn, the most effective type of fat in aiding the absorption of vitamins A, D, K2 and especially beta carotene, is saturated fat.  The least effective? Those industrially produced polyunsaturated oils such as canola and soy.

Just like the loving body of believers in Ephesians 4 who are “joined and held together by every supporting ligament, grows and builds itself up in love, as each part does its work.”  So do our own physical bodies work when we honor the foods created to work synergistically within us as each nutrient does its work to build us up.

This was posted as part of the Sunday Social Blog Hop.

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Sunday Social Blog Hop

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Avocado and Grapefruit Salad with Lime and Fresh Mint

The weather here in Central Florida has been spectacular this week – blue skies, fluffy white clouds, temps in the mid-70s to low 80s, cool breezes in the palm trees – it’s like living in a vacation postcard 🙂   The mint in my yard is growing like crazy, I picked enough peppermint to dry and use for peppermint tea, and I’m using the English mint in a great salad recipe that I can’t wait to share with you today!  Grapefruit season stretches on at least through the end of this month and it’s getting to that time of year where people are tired of it and are leaving bags of it in the back hall at church or on people’s front porches.  My avocado tree is already blooming, getting ready for next year, but I did find a big bag of five avocadoes for $4 at Sam’s Club.

English mint

English mint

I love all the different tastes and textures in this dish with juicy tart grapefruit, creamy rich avocado, and the mojito magic of the lime and mint all come together to create a salad that makes its own dressing.   I’ve used spring mix, and I’ve used different kinds of head lettuces, but I also think arugula might be good with its peppery bite.  Sturdy Romaine holds up well if you want leftovers.  Peel and supreme the grapefruit right over the bowl you will use for the salad so you catch all the juices.  Never supreme a grapefruit? It’s easy, but you need a sharp knife! Just peel the fruit including the white pith, then use the sharp knife to slice out the individual sections and tossing the membrane (but not before squeezing out any remaining juice into the bowl!)

Avocado and Grapefruit Salad with Lime and Fresh Mint
 
Author:
Recipe type: salad
 
Bright flavors and contrasting textures in a salad that makes its own dressing.
Ingredients
  • 2 large pink grapefruit
  • ⅓ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • juice from one lime (and a little zest if desired)
  • ½ tsp sea salt
  • 1 or 2 Hass type avocadoes
  • 1 head of lettuce or bag of spring mix, washed and spun dry
  • big handful of fresh mint leaves
Instructions
  1. Peel and supreme the grapefruit catching the juices in the bowl.
  2. Peel, pit and chop the avocado.
  3. Chop or slice the lettuce into fork-size pieces.
  4. Finely slice the mint leaves.
  5. Combine all the ingredients in a large salad bowl and toss well to coat the lettuce and distribute the ingredients.

fresh farmer's market finds

fresh farmer’s market finds

 

 

 

 

 

This blog is being shared on the Sunday Social Blog Hop.

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Hybrid vs. GMO – What is the Difference?

I’ve been hearing lately that people are confused about what it means exactly to be GMO and how that is different from being hybridized. I’m posting this in hopes of clearing up that confusion. Please let me know in the comments if you still have questions.

Think back to elementary school science class about how we classify all living things. We start with the very broadest of categories, called Kingdoms, and then get narrower and narrower, until we reach one single living thing. For example here’s the classification for a cow:   Kingdom Animalia, Phylum Chordata, Class Mammalia, Order Artiodactyla, Family Bovidae, Genus Bos, Species Bos taurus or Cow

cows

Bos taurus or Cow

In nature things cannot reproduce with other things that are not closely related. Usually this means they have to at least be the same Species or the same Genus. So even if two things are in the same Kingdom, Phylum, or Class they cannot breed together. This is why we don’t have Minotaurs, Centaurs or Hippogriffs roaming around.

 

 

Hybrid

cockapoo

Cockapoo

 

A Toyota Prius is a hybrid car. It combines features from gas and electric cars to create a new kind of car that can use both fuels. A hybrid living thing is a lot like the Prius. Two different, but closely-related, organisms reproduce to make a new offspring. This happens in nature when a Blue-winged warbler mates with a Gold-winged warbler and they have little baby Lawrence warbler chicks, hybrids between the Blue and Gold. People can facilitate hybrids like when a Cocker Spaniel is bred with a poodle to make designer puppies called Cockapoos. In each case, whether bird or dog, the organisms are close enough that they can reproduce without surgical or technological help. Hybridizing techniques have been used for centuries to make more beautiful roses, hardier tomatoes, and fluffier sheep, and a whole lot more.

 

GMO (Genetically Modified Organism)

A Genetically Modified Organism is a living thing, whether plant, bacteria, insect or animal, whose genetic material has been altered using technology through genetic engineering techniques. Perhaps a better name more clearly expressing this combination of genetically unrelated things would be trans-genic . This biotech process produces a completely new living organism with novel genetic material. These completely modern organisms cannot happen without technological intervention because they combine two unrelated things.

hippogriff

hippogriff

 

Like the mythological Hippogriff that combined lion and eagle to create something entirely its own new being, the biotechnology that combines genetically unrelated organisms has created a new population of seemingly mythical creatures. So far GMO technology has produced combinations of such unrelated organisms as corn with jellyfish, sugarcane with human, corn with hepatitis virus, soybean with soil bacteria, canola with bay tree, spiders with goats, fish with strawberries, corn with bacteria, and pigs with jellyfish.

When foreign DNA invades your body, as when a cold virus tries to live in your nose, you automatically launch an attack to get rid of it. The watery eyes, the runny nose, all that mucus – that’s your body trying to evict the invaders. The genes of all living things naturally guard against foreign DNA. As we discussed at the beginning of this article, unless two things are closely related, their DNA does not willingly combine. In order to create trans-genic GMO it requires outside intervention, special technology; and truthfully this technology isn’t all that precise.

To insert foreign DNA into a non-compliant organism requires drastic measures. We use gene guns with DNA-coated ammunition and shoot them at cells; we use electric shocks to tear holes into cells to stick in the new DNA; we use viruses to “infect” cells with new DNA. Out of thousands of bombarded cells only a few get successfully re-engineered.

We are still learning about genetic expression and the environment’s effect on our genes. The field of epigenetics is in its infancy. We do know every living thing is connected by the vast web of life. Not only are there unknown consequences to altering living things by tampering with their genes, but the natural environment is also at risk.  A trans-genic plant produces pollen that blows on the wind; insects chew these plants and are then eaten by other animals; small animals live in the fields and nest among the roots of these plants. A GMO fish swims away with its new genetic material sharing it with other fish as it mates, and sharing it with the animal that eats it for supper.

We already know that pollen from GMO corn carried by the wind has landed on milkweed plants killing off monarch butterfly larvae who were eating the pollen-coated milkweed. The monarch butterfly already has “Near Threatened” status. This surely won’t help its recovery.

When plants and animals used as food are genetically modified, it can also change their nutritional profile.  It can give them too much or too little of certain nutrients, or even create new kinds of proteins that have never been in our food supply. This affects the animals and people that eat them. Safety testing has been left up to the companies that produce these GMO foods. The FDA does not do independent testing. Some in the scientific community are now taking it on themselves to test GMOs and are finding toxins, allergens and nutritional problems to be just the tip of the iceberg.

For more about GMOs go here or here or here. This blog is being posted on the Sunday Social Blog Hop.

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Sunday Social Blog Hop

Some links may be monetized. This blog is for informational purposes only. 

Inspiration to Make a Difference

Tallahassee meeting welcome to Florida

Last week I took my kids to Tallahassee for the annual FPEA (Florida Parent Educators Association) Day at the Capitol.  We’ve been learning about America’s government and the Constitution, and I thought this would make a great field trip – to see our state government in action. Although FPEA had some events scheduled they encouraged everyone to make time to see Representatives and Senators from their local districts just to say “Hi” and maybe talk about some of the issues about which we’re concerned. So a week or so before the trip I sent some emails, made a few phone calls and managed to get a few appointments with some lawmakers I knew were working to make laws near and dear to my heart. Yep, the battle to label GMOs is coming to Florida!

Tallahassee meeting with Michelle Rehwinkel Vasilinda

meeting with Representative Michelle Rehwinkel Vasilinda about GMO labeling

Thanks to the super-nice Teri Cariota we were able to squeeze in a meeting with Representative Michelle Rehwinkel Vasilinda (D – Leon County) who is the sponsor of HB1, the House bill to label GMOs.  Representative Rehwinkel Vasilinda is a petite mother of two who has been in the Florida House for about six years. She has done her homework on genetic engineering and feels it is important that we all have open access to what goes into our food. Her bill calls for mandatory labeling of raw ingredients and processed foods that are made with genetically engineered items. The bill has been filed and has now gone to the Agriculture and Natural Resources Committee where it sits until it gets put on the committee agenda.  It must be heard in committee before anything else can happen, and so far it hasn’t made it onto the agenda. The committee Chairman is Matt Caldwell (R – Lehigh Acres).  He was the next person we went to talk to.

When we found Representative Caldwell’s office he was not there. We had 5 teenagers and 5 parents in our group and I think we surprised the office staff, but his assistant, Charlotte Gammie, took down our message along with my contact info. She was probably the least responsive person we came in contact with all day. I have not heard back from Representative Caldwell yet. I hope he got our message that we’d really like his committee to discuss HB1 sometime soon.

Tallahassee meeting the Rep Michelle and group

Five teens and five parents and one lawmaker concerned about GMOs

Next we had an appointment over on the Senate side of the Capitol.  We were hoping to see Senator Jeremy Ring (D – Broward County), the sponsor of the GMO legislation in the Senate, SB558. Unfortunately we did not see him either, in spite of our appointment the Senator was delayed after his last meeting. But we did talk to his aide who took us into the Senator’s office, sat us all down (all 10 of us), listened to what we had to say and took notes. According to what the aide told us, the Senate bill is in much the same situation as the House bill. It is filed and gone to the Senate Agriculture Committee waiting to be put on the agenda. It looks like the committee is a bit apprehensive about putting this bill up for discussion which is understandable since this is a hot topic all over the U.S.  But to me this is all the more reason we need to tackle the issue, not let it languish under red tape, because it’s not going away. Too many people care about this now, and we are reaching a tipping point in this country. Senator Ring’s aide encouraged us to drop by the committee chair’s office. So that’s where we went next.

The Senate Chair for the Agriculture Committee is Senator Bill Montford (D – Apalachicola). Once again we found the Senator absent but his office aides present. These aides were friendly and attentive. They found us an empty conference room and sat us all down around the conference table. We spoke to Marcia Mathis, Legislative Assistant, who had great people skills and seemed impressed with the fact that we had teenagers who were listening, interested and engaged with what was going on. At this point just about everyone in our group knew where we wanted the conversation to go and they all chimed in with why GMO labeling was important to them. Ms. Mathis gave us at least 20 minutes of her time that afternoon and I hope she left the meeting more informed about why GMO labeling is so controversial and how the residents of Florida will benefit from SB558.

We ended that day feeling like we’d made some kind of a difference in our home state. And now it’s your turn to keep this conversation moving.  We need everyone to contact the committee chairs for the House and the Senate and urge them to put the GMO labeling bills onto the committees’ agendas. I’ve given links to the websites where you can find their email addresses to the names of each person above. It only takes a minute to fill out the form and send your thoughts. We also need to contact Florida’s Commissioner of Agriculture, Mr. Adam Putnam, who also sits on Florida’s Cabinet. Commissioner Putnam needs to know how we feel, and he also needs to hear from small family farmers who stand to lose the most if GMO labeling fails.

Floridians have the right to know what’s in their food – and so does the rest of the United States. Florida can lead the way by passing HB1 and SB558.

This blog is part of the Sunday Social Blog Hop.

Sunday Social Blog Hop

Sunday Social Blog Hop

Breakfast Pizza

Breakfast Pizza makes a fun change of pace for a leisurely weekend brunch, or you can do much of it ahead on the weekend to have it ready for a quick and portable weekday breakfast.
The crust uses durum or semolina flour to add a nice crunchy texture, but you can substitute all-purpose flour if you like. A printable recipe appears below, but I’ve written it out step by step with pictures to illustrate here.

Breakfast Pizza (makes 8)
For the crust:

1 3/4 cup white whole wheat flour
1 1/4 cups durum or semolina wheat flour
1 Tblsp pizza herbs (I used Frontier Pizza Seasoning)
1 tsp instant yeast
1 tsp sea salt
2 Tblsp extra virgin olive oil
1 1/4 cups filtered water

For the topping:

4 eggs, preferably from pastured hens
2 cups (8oz) shredded cheese – your choice of cheddar, swiss, colby or Monterey Jack
4 slices of nitrite-free bacon OR 4 oz. of homemade pork or turkey sausage

For the dough, combine all of the crust ingredients in your mixer, bread machine or a large bowl. Mix until the dough comes together and then knead for about five minutes until you have a somewhat shaggy dough.  Place the dough in a large, well oiled bowl and cover it with a clean tea towel or oiled plastic wrap.  Let the dough rise at least two hours but as long as overnight on the countertop OR you can refrigerate the dough for up to 7 days.
This long rising time allows the flavor to develop as the yeast feeds on the carbohydrates in the flour. This also lets you prepare the dough the night before or even earlier giving you less prep time at breakfast.

For the topping, combine the eggs and cheese in a medium bowl.  Cut the bacon into small squares or crumble the sausage into little bits (uncooked) and stir it into the egg mixture.  Cover and refrigerate the topping until you are ready to assemble the pizzas.

To bake the pizzas, preheat the oven to 450 degrees and then divide the dough into eight pieces about 3 oz each. (You can make them larger but you’ll get fewer pizzas) Roll the dough into a circle about 5 or 6″ in diameter. Larger circles make thinner crispy crust, smaller circles make thicker chewy crust. To keep the topping from oozing off pinch a little edge around the rim of the circles.  Place the circles on lightly greased or parchment lined baking sheets.

Bake the empty crusts for 7-8 minutes. Remove from the oven.* Divide the topping evenly among the crusts and return them to the oven for 14-16 more minutes. The topping should be golden and bubbly. Remove from the oven and serve hot or let them cool on a cooling rack until you are ready to eat.

*You can stop at this point and let the par-baked crusts cool and freeze them in a zip-top freezer bag. To use later just let them thaw a bit, top them and bake as directed for the second baking with the topping.

These little pizzas are very portable. They are full of healthy proteins and fats and make a fun way to get more eggs into your kids.

Breakfast Pizza
 
Author:
Recipe type: breakfast
Serves: 8
 
Personal size pizzas filled with hearty proteins, healthy fats and whole grain goodness great for breakfast and easy to make ahead.
Ingredients
  • 1¾ cup white whole wheat flour or regular whole wheat flour
  • 1¼ cups durum wheat flour (substitute semolina or unbleached all-purpose flour if you don't have durum)
  • 1 Tblsp Italian seasoning or Pizza Herbs such as Frontier Pizza Seasoning
  • 1 tsp instant yeast
  • 1 tsp sea salt
  • 2 Tblsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 1¼ cups filtered water
  • 4 eggs from free-range hens
  • 2 cups (8oz) shredded cheese such as cheddar, swiss, Colby or Jack
  • 4 slices of nitrite-free bacon OR 4 oz of homemade pork or turkey sausage
Instructions
  1. For the crust combine the flours, herbs, yeast, salt, olive oil and water in a mixer, bread machine or food processor bowl.
  2. Mix until the dough comes together and then knead about 5 minutes.
  3. Place the dough in a large, well-oiled container and cover loosely with a towel or plastic wrap.
  4. Let the dough rise 2 hours and then proceed with baking, or you can refrigerate the dough for up to 7 days and use as needed.
  5. To make the pizza topping combine the eggs and cheese in a medium bowl.
  6. Cut the raw bacon or sausage into small pieces and stir it into the egg mixture. Cover and refrigerate the topping, as long as overnight, until you are ready to assemble the pizzas.
  7. To bake the pizzas preheat your oven to 450 degrees and divide the crust into 8 pieces about 3oz each.
  8. Roll the dough into circles about 5-6" in diameter with smaller being chewy and larger being crispy.
  9. Place the crust circles on lightly greased or parchment covered baking sheets.
  10. Bake the empty crusts for 7-8 minutes, then remove from the oven.*
  11. Divide the topping evenly among the crusts and return to the oven for 14-16 more minutes until the topping is golden and bubbly.
  12. *You can let the partially baked crusts cool and then freeze them to use later, just remove from the freezer and allow to thaw a bit before topping and baking as directed.
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Sunday Social Blog Hop

Teach Them Diligently…To Cook!

I went to get my hair cut Friday. My old stylist had moved and I had to use someone new which always makes me a little nervous. Not only about whether or not they will do a good job on my hair, but also whether or not our personalities will hit it off. Thankfully both turned out well, I liked my haircut and I liked the stylist. She’s a young mother of two with a blended family that includes two more children – so four kids all under the age of 11! During our conversation it came up that we homeschool, and that I teach nutrition classes. She’s already on board with the idea that kids should eat real food and not a lot of packaged foods or drive-thru meals. I told her the one thing that still surprises me when I talk to moms’ groups was just how many adults don’t know how to do anything in the kitchen beyond microwaving something out of a package. She got quiet for a little bit and then confessed “I do that a lot more than I probably should. It’s just that who has time to cook?”  I agreed that time was a big factor for a lot of people and that the best thing I ever did was to teach my son to cook starting when he was very young so that by six years old he could scramble eggs and make toast and now, at age 15, he can make entire meals, even concocting new dishes (mostly spicy and involving onions and/or bacon). My stylist grew thoughtful and said “My older daughter is 8 and she keeps asking to help me, she wants to stir things when I’m cooking, but I’ve never let her do it yet. Maybe I should start.”  um…YES!!

RJ washing lemons

As soon as your children are old enough to follow simple directions they are old enough to begin helping out in the kitchen. My sister, Amy, has done a super job with this. My 16 yr old nephew and 13 yr old niece are both very handy in the kitchen, you can watch Lucy make guacamole in this video. The two younger girls are also on their way with the 2nd grader making scrambled eggs, cinnamon toast and emptying the dishwasher while the 3 yr old is ready to wash any fruits or vegetables, use a childsafe knife to cut things into cubes, and to help her big sister make muffins.  Do our kids cook because we homeschool?  I don’t think so because I know non-homeschooling families whose children can cook, do laundry and help around the house and the yard – but I find homeschooling families are often more purposeful about it frequently including these kinds of tasks in the daily lessons. “Life Skills” are vital for any young person. 

July Sierra Exif JPEG

As parents we are charged with the responsibility of raising up our children to be ready to enter the world equipped to be vital, useful members of society. I loved the story my friend, Nicole, told me about her then 9yr old son. They have a family tradition of Dad making pancakes every Saturday morning, and not from a mix either. Like us, they grind grain to make freshly milled flour (see more here). When they were preparing for a new baby the 9yr old said “Don’t worry, I’m going to make the pancakes now.” He’d been helping his dad all along and felt confident enough to take over the job, including using the grain mill, to make the Saturday pancakes for his brothers and sisters while Dad was helping with the new baby. It’s been his job ever since!  And just this weekend Amy was able to take a friend on a surprise overnight birthday trip leaving her kids behind to cook all the meals, clean up, and take care of the animals (yes, Dad was still at home, but the kids kept the homestead running), without worrying too much about them burning the house down or eating pop-tarts three meals a day.

Bryan & Lucy cook 07Sue Gregg, an amazing woman and author of at least eight real food cookbooks, has a page on her website called Cooking With Children where she shares more than 40 different cooking tasks and recipes parents can do with their children starting as young as 3 yrs old.  As soon as kids can read they can follow simple written recipes and begin to cook independently. Encourage them to help you make out menus for the week’s meals that include foods they can prepare. Soon you can give them responsibility over one meal per week, and then one week per month. I think there should be a requirement for high school graduation that the child must be able to plan for, shop, and prepare breakfast, lunch and dinner for at least one week. They have to do it for real when they’re out on their own, why not give them the skills and knowledge of how to do it the right way? Consider it just one more investment in their future – and in the future of their family, their children (your grandchildren!)

Deuteronomy 6:7 And thou shalt teach them diligently unto thy children, and shalt talk of them when thou sittest in thine house, and when thou walkest by the way, and when thou liest down, and when thou risest up.

March*Post Script to this blog: I’d like to give a shout-out to GNOWFGLINS Traditional Foods cooking courses. Both my teens are taking the Fundamentals I course as part of their weekly schooling this fall in our homeschool. There are several courses to choose from and they are self-directed so the children can move along at their own pace.

sunday social

Sunday Social Blog Hop

This was posted as part of the Sunday Social blog hop. Some links may be monetized. This blog is for informational purposes only.

 

 

 

 

 

Sunday Social Blog Hop for March 2, 2014

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 Welcome!

What Is The Sunday Social Blog Hop?

A virtual “Sunday Social”, where we all gather together and share good food recipes and be an encouragement to one another with articles of spiritual and inspirational nature.

Come join us, submit YOUR articles, browse around and visit a site or two and learn some new recipes and be encouraged!

This Blog Hop is being hosted by:

Kat @ Simply Living Simply

Marci @ Amazing Graze Farm

Lee @ Well Fed Family

Sara @ The Granola Mommy

Tessa @ Homestead Lady

Pam @ Thankful Expressions

Priscilla @ salam mama

Angela @ Grassfed Mama

  What Can I Post?

 Anything and everything related to Food AND Inspirational/Spiritual/Religious.

*Make sure and include either a text link or the blog hop button below (copy/save) in your linked post.

We would be pleased as punch if you wanted to put this button in your sidebar:

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 How Can I Be A Featured Blogger?

By linking up! Our featured blogger is chosen each week at random by our Co-hosts…and we hope to have YOU as our next featured blogger!

If you are selected as “Featured”, make sure and grab your button (just copy/paste):

sunday social feat 200

**Please note: By linking to this Blog Hop you are giving us permission to link back to your post if you are featured. We will also include 1 photo from your post in the interest of sending visitors your way. So you don’t miss a single Blog Hop, we will also add you to our e-mail reminder list.  For a little extra exposure/marketing BONUS, we will also “PIN” your submissions on our PINTEREST Board-HOP on over and check that out….HERE!  Just a quick reminder: All posts are welcome, however let’s keep them uplifting, encouraging, respectful and kind…otherwise they may be removed**

Congratulations to our Featured Blogger:

Eat Better Spend Less

Eat Better Spend Less

Eat Better Spend Less

Strawberry Lemon Whole Wheat Muffins

HOP on over and visit Beth at Eat Better Spend Less, browse around and let her know you saw her featured in The Sunday Social!

 Let the blogging begin…

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Sunday Social Blog Hop for February 23, 2014

sunday social 3

Welcome!

What Is The Sunday Social Blog Hop?

A virtual “Sunday Social”, where we all gather together and share good food recipes and be an encouragement to one another with articles of spiritual and inspirational nature.

Come join us, submit YOUR articles, browse around and visit a site or two and learn some new recipes and be encouraged!

This Blog Hop is being hosted by:

Heather @ Life in the Faith Lane

Kat @ Simply Living Simply

Marci @ Amazing Graze Farm

Lee @ Well Fed Family

Sara @ The Granola Mommy

Tessa @ Homestead Lady

Hannah @ Whole Simple Life

Pam @ Thankful Expressions

Priscilla @ salam mama

Angela @ Grassfed Mama

What Can I Post?

Anything and everything related to Food AND Inspirational/Spiritual/Religious.

*Make sure and include either a text link or the blog hop button below (copy/save) in your linked post.

We would be pleased as punch if you wanted to put this button in your sidebar:

sunday social 200

How Can I Be A Featured Blogger?

By linking up! Our featured blogger is chosen each week at random by our Co-hosts…and we hope to have YOU as our next featured blogger!

If you are selected as “Featured”, make sure and grab your button (just copy/paste):

sunday social feat 200

**Please note: By linking to this Blog Hop you are giving us permission to link back to your post if you are featured. We will also include 1 photo from your post in the interest of sending visitors your way. So you don’t miss a single Blog Hop, we will also add you to our e-mail reminder list. For a little extra exposure/marketing BONUS, we will also “PIN” your submissions on our PINTEREST Board-HOP on over and check that out….HERE! Just a quick reminder: All posts are welcome, however let’s keep them uplifting, encouraging, respectful and kind…otherwise they may be removed**

Congratulations to our Featured Blogger:

Our Simple Life

Our Simple Life

Our Simple Life

How to Have a Thankful Heart

Hop on over and visit Tracy @Our Simple Life and check out her wonderful site!

NOW… Let the blogging begin…

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