Tag Archives: soup

Simple Squash Soup with Sage

sqash soup 1 titles

One of my privileges is to be a Weston A Price Foundation chapter leader.  I get to meet lots of friendly people, spread the word about healthy food, and schedule interesting speakers who teach us about all kinds of interesting things. Last month my friend Pam Wesley, who is a certified GAPS practitioner at Flourish Nutrition Centre, spoke to our chapter about the differences between the GAPS diet and the traditional diets of the Weston A Price Foundation. She also cooked this amazing soup and brought it to share with everyone.

I made the soup this weekend and shared some with a neighbor and shared the rest with my chapter co-leader, Steve Moreau, when he came over for dinner so we could plan out the chapter activities for the next couple of months.

Usually when I make soups from winter squashes I use butternut, but Pam had used acorn squash which gave the soup a different texture. I got wild and crazy at the grocery store and bought a buttercup squash just to try it out. I’d never had one before and turns out I’ve been missing something great – the buttercup flesh is thick and velvety when it is cooked and the soup came out so creamy!

squash at publix with labels

This soup is appropriate for the maintenance stage of the GAPS diet, or if you leave out the cream you can have it during the intro stage as well. The egg yolks are optional, but add extra vitamins and minerals.

Simple Squash Soup with Sage

5 Tablespoons sweet cream butter

1 medium yellow onion, diced

2 lbs fresh winter squash, peeled and cubed

4 cups homemade chicken stock

3 egg yolks

1 cup heavy cream

fresh sage, minced

sea salt

freshly ground pepper

Melt 2 tablespoons of the butter in a heavy bottomed Dutch oven. Add the onion and saute until tender. Add the squash and the stock, simmer until the squash is tender, about 20 minutes.

Use a blender, food processor or immersion blender to puree the soup to a velvety smooth texture. Return to the pan. Beat together the egg yolks and the cream and add to the soup. Heat gently but do not boil. Add sea salt and pepper to taste. Sprinkle with fresh sage and swirl in the remaining 3 tablespoons of butter and serve.

Simple Squash Soup with Sage
 
Author:
Recipe type: soup
 
This GAPS friendly soup is delicious enough to serve to company.
Ingredients
  • 5 Tablespoons sweet cream butter
  • 1 medium yellow onion, diced
  • 2 lbs fresh winter squash, peeled and cubed
  • 4 cups homemade chicken stock
  • 3 egg yolks
  • 1 cup heavy cream (preferably raw, not ultra-pasteurized)
  • fresh sage, minced
  • sea salt
  • pepper
Instructions
  1. Melt 2 Tablespoons of butter in a large pot.
  2. Add the onion and saute until tender.
  3. Add the squash and the stock, simmer until the squash is tender, about 20 minutes.
  4. Use a blender, food processor or immersion blender to puree the soup to a velvety smooth texture.
  5. Return soup to the pan.
  6. Beat together the egg yolks and the cream in a separate bowl, and add to the soup.
  7. Heat gently but do not boil.
  8. Add sea salt and pepper to taste.
  9. Sprinkle with fresh sage and swirl in the remaining 3 tablespoons of butter and serve.

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This recipe was shared with Wildcrafting Wednesday #163

 

 

Tomato Basil Soup

tomato basil soup title

 I hope your summer garden is giving you an abundance of basil, because you will definitely want to make this soup! It is easy enough for a fast weeknight supper (we like it along with grilled cheese sandwiches), but delicious enough for a special meal. Don’t try to substitute dried basil, the flavor just won’t be the same. If you are lucky enough to have a surplus of fresh tomatoes you can use those instead of using the canned tomatoes called for in the recipe. Just use about 3 lbs. of fresh tomatoes, peeled, seeded and chopped; and add about 20 minutes to the cooking time to let them break down well enough before blending.

5.0 from 1 reviews
Tomato Basil Soup
 
Author:
Recipe type: soup
Cuisine: Italian
 
Aromatic fresh basil is used in abundance to make this delicious but simple soup.
Ingredients
  • 3 Tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 Tablespoon of butter
  • 3 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 4 cups of chicken broth
  • 1½ teaspoons of sea salt
  • 1 28oz can of whole tomatoes, undrained
  • 1 15 oz can of whole tomatoes, undrained
  • 1-2 teaspoons raw honey
  • 1 cup of fresh basil leaves (about 1 large handful) plus more for garnish
Instructions
  1. Heat the oil and butter in a large pot over medium heat.
  2. Add the garlic and cook only about 30 seconds, stirring constantly.
  3. Stir in the tomatoes and salt and cook one minute.
  4. Pour in the chicken broth and stir well.
  5. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat, cover and simmer about 20 minutes.
  6. Roughly chop the fresh basil and stir into the soup along with the honey.
  7. Place the soup in a blender, one half of it at a time, and puree until smooth, or use an immersion blender and puree directly in the pot.
  8. Taste for salt, and serve garnished with more slivered basil if desired.

Use the links at the top of the page to Pin this recipe for later, share it on Facebook or Tweet it to a friend on Twitter. Be sure to visit Red + Honey’s Sunday Night Soups link up where I’ve linked up this recipe with a whole big bowl full of other soup ideas.

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How To Make Good Soup

stone soupDo you remember the children’s story about stone soup? Strangers stopping in a small village are given the cold shoulder until, one by one, each villager is persuaded to add an ingredient to the pot while the strangers contribute a stone to the boiling water. The original legend says this soup was the first minestrone and that one of the strangers was actually Godfrey of Bouillon, a medieval knight.  Truth or legend doesn’t matter, the moral of the story is true: in times of scarcity and poverty we are still able to provide nourishment and delicious food to our own families and have enough to share in hospitality with others in need. Soup provides a way to do all of that and more.

“Whenever possible give your soups the full flavor of homemade stock.” – Julia Child

Homemade stocks, also called bone broths, have been around for as long as there have been cooking pots, and make the base for the very best soups.  There is a simple beauty in these stocks as they give us deep nourishment as well as allowing us to use even the hard, normally inedible parts of the animal showing common sense, frugality and a respect for the life of the animal that was given for your sustenance.  The bones of any and every creature were used for stock which then became soup, sauce, gravy or even beverage.  Find a recipe for a basic bone broth here, or watch our video tutorial on roasting a chicken and making broth here. You can also save the pan juices from your roasting pan when you roast a chicken, leg of lamb, pot roast or turkey. These pan drippings have enormous flavor concentrated into a small volume and can be added to soups to intensify flavor or to stand in when you don’t have enough stock.

“There is no such thing as a good chicken bouillon, and you should stoop to using canned chicken broth only during times of dire emergency.” – Jeff Smith, The Frugal Gourmet

To make your soup start with a big, heavy bottom pot at least 2 quarts or larger. The first stage begins with the “aromatics”. These are strong-flavored ingredients frequently sauteed together in butter, lard, duck fat or coconut oil to lend a complexity to the flavor of the finished soup. Aromatics can include onion, carrot, celery, shallots, garlic, leek, sweet or hot peppers, bacon, pancetta or salt pork. Asian soups often use toasted spices such as turmeric, cumin, fenugreek or cardamom as part of the aromatics. You can also use herbs bundled together and simmered in the soup and removed just before serving – bay leaf, parsley stems, thyme sprigs for example. Saute the aromatic vegetables about five minutes taking care not to burn, then advance to the next step.

adding potatoesNow it’s time to add the sturdier vegetables such as cubes of potato, turnip, broccoli, cabbage, winter squash or other root vegetable, or cooked beans. Toss them with the aromatics to coat them with the hot fat and then add in the homemade stock or bone broth. Simmer the vegetables 10-15 minutes and then add any additional softer vegetables such as zucchini, kale or some chopped cook meat such as leftover roast chicken or beef, or tiny meatballs. Add a little salt and pepper at this time as well. Continue to simmer 10 or 15 more minutes until the vegetables are done to your liking. Taste again for salt and add more if needed.

Now it’s time for the enrichments.  In some Mediterranean areas one egg or egg yolk per person is added, either beaten in to thicken the soup or poached in some broth and added to the pot. Or you can add freshly grated cheese, sour cream, creme fraiche, coconut milk or heavy cream.  Turn off the heat under the pot before you add in any of the cultured dairy ingredients or they may curdle and you will lose the probiotic aspect. 

Ladle the soup into serving bowls and add a flavorful garnish.  Garnishes can include a dollop of pesto or spicy tomato paste, a spoonful of capers or sliced olives, lemon zest and finely chopped parsley, chopped fresh chervil or chives, a bit of butter or swirl of extra virgin olive oil, some buttered croutons, or a drizzle of fish sauce. You can also add a spoonful of lacto-fermented salsa, sauerkraut or fruit chutney for added flavor and a probiotic boost.

 

Delicious soup isn’t hard or expensive to make. When you know the basic technique you can have gourmet soup just by cleaning out the refrigerator or freezer. With a bit of planning your soup can be a memorable meal.

soup-and-muffinsoup-and-muffinbeef stew with ladle

 

Creamy Turkey and Brown Rice Soup

turkey rice soup 2 titlesThe base of this soup is your own homemade turkey stock.  The key to rich, flavorful stock that also nourishes and heals is adding a bit of vinegar or lemon juice to the water along with the bones at the beginning to successfully pull out all of the minerals, collagen and other nutrients. Then give homemade stock plenty of time to simmer, 24-48 hours if you are able, until the bones become soft and the marrow has dissolved into your stock. Watch Well Fed Family demonstrate roasting a chicken and making stock on our YouTube Channel. The same directions apply with a turkey, you’d just have to roast it longer, about 2 to 2 1/2 hours at least.

 Creamy Turkey and Brown Rice Soup

2 Tablespoons butter

2 large carrots, peeled and chopped

1 stalk organic celery, chopped

1 small onion, chopped

1 teaspoon dried thyme

2 quarts homemade turkey (or chicken) stock

1 cup brown rice (you could also use wild rice or a mixture of both)

1 cup good quality cream (not ultra-pasteurized)

3 cups chopped, cooked turkey

2 teaspoons sea salt

freshly ground black pepper

Melt the butter in a heavy bottomed pot over medium heat.  Saute the carrots, celery and onion for about 5 minutes until the onions are translucent. Add the rice and continue to saute until the rice is well coated with butter and begins to sizzle, about three more minutes.

Add the turkey stock and dried thyme and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer, covered, until the rice is tender, about 1 hour.

After the rice and vegetables are soft, add the chopped turkey and continue heating another 15 minutes. Next slowly pour the cream into the simmering soup, stirring constantly.  If you are using raw cream you can completely remove the soup from the heat before stirring it in.  Season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve.

Creamy Turkey and Brown Rice Soup
 
Author:
Recipe type: soup
 
comforting creamy soup for cold winter evenings
Ingredients
  • 2 Tablespoons butter
  • 2 carrots, peeled and chopped
  • 1 stalk organic celery, chopped
  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 2 quarts homemade turkey or chicken stock
  • 1 cup brown rice (or wild rice)
  • 1 cup good quality cream (not ultra-pasteurized)
  • 3 cups chopped, cooked turkey
  • 2 teaspoons sea salt
  • freshly ground black pepper
Instructions
  1. Melt the butter in a heavy bottomed Dutch oven over medium heat.
  2. Saute the carrots, celery and onion for about 5 minutes until the onions are translucent.
  3. Add the rice and continue to saute until the rice is well coated with butter and begins to sizzle, about three more minutes.
  4. Add the turkey stock and thyme and bring to a boil.
  5. Reduce heat and simmer, covered, until the rice is tender, about 1 hour.
  6. Add the chopped turkey and 1 teaspoon of the salt and the pepper.
  7. Slowly stir in the cream, taking care to stir constantly so the cream does not curdle.
  8. Simmer another few minutes until slightly thickened.
  9. Taste for salt and add the remaining salt if needed.
  10. *Note - if using raw cream, remove the soup from the heat before adding the cream so as not to destroy all of the enzymes.

 

Serving suggestions to round out your meal could include                                                                     a big green salad, sliced oranges,  or some apple slices with some sliced raw cheeseturkey rice soup.

 

 

 

 

 

We love this soup on cold fall and winter evenings! It’s perfect for using up leftover holiday turkey. Pin this recipe for later using the media buttons at the top of the page.

This blog is for informational purposes. Some links may be monetized.