Tag Archives: low carb

Low Carb [Keto] Protein Bars [Fat Bomb]

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Keto. Ketones. Keto diet. Ketogenic lifestyle.

These are some of the most searched terms on the Internet today.

Ketones are produced in smaller amounts naturally by everybody. People who are adapted to fat as their primary fuel instead of carbohydrates will naturally produce and use them in higher amounts.

The goal of the ketogenic lifestyle is to adapt the body to utilize FAT as its primary fuel source instead of SUGAR.  Fat can be a healthier and more sustainable source of energy

Ketones help you burn fat for energy, powerfully reduce inflammation and show promise in preventing and eradicating diabetes, cancer, autoimmune and neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.

It was early 2016 when I first made the switch into a low-carb/high-fat way of eating. It was a long time coming; a decision I made only after doing a lot of research and reading. The one book that inspired me to finally take the plunge was Keto Clarity by Jimmy Moore.

I really wish I had had access to a conference or online summit at the time to guide me through my transition into keto. Since those early days I have discovered work from other experts like David Perlmutter, Thomas Seyfried, Brian Mowll, and David Jockers, and the research these doctors have done in the value of a ketogenic diet.

The Keto Edge Summit  is exactly the kind of all-inclusive package I wish I had when I was starting out.  I’m glad it is now available to help other people who want to try keto. And many of the doctors doing cutting edge research in keto are featured in the summit!

One thing I needed was a source for recipes that were keto-friendly.  I was glad to find at the end of Keto Clarity a small recipes to get you started.

I really liked the recipe called “Camille’s Keto Energy Bars“. I liked the convenience of having a portable snack or quick breakfast. One to keep me satisfied with plenty of healthy fats.  Most energy bars you can buy are way too high in carbs to work for people in ketosis. So this homemade version filled that need.

The original recipe was made with a lot of almond butter, raw nuts and cacao nibs. But I still don’t do well with too many nuts, and although chocolate tastes great it really messes with my sleep no matter when I eat it. 🙁

So I came up with my own version of this grab-and-go bar that includes some extra protein from collagen, and swaps the nut butters and nuts for ingredients that are more digestible and make me feel so much better!

Crispy nuts are something I discovered years ago when I joined the Weston A Price Foundation. The Nourishing Traditions Cookbook has several recipes for making high enzyme, digestible and delicious crispy nuts of all kinds. You can also find a recipe here. I like to keep a big jar of crispy nuts in my pantry for quick snacks.

I like the addition of high protein hemp hearts and omega-3 rich chia seeds for a nutritional boost.

If you aren’t familiar with the term “fat bomb” – it is used a lot in the Keto world to describe a small snack that is made primarily from healthy fats like coconut oil or butter. They are used to curb cravings and help tide you over between meals.

Low Carb [Keto] Protein Bars [Fat Bombs]

1 cup coconut oil, very soft

1 cup coconut butter, softened

1/2 cup grassfed whey vanilla protein powder

1 10g packet Vital Proteins collagen powder

1/2 cup dried cranberries or dried blueberries

1 cup shredded unsweetened coconut

1/2 cup crispy pecans or walnuts (see note above for how to do this)

1/2 cup crispy or raw pumpkin seeds (make crispy pumpkin seeds just like crispy nuts)

1/4 cup hemp hearts

1 Tablespoon chia seeds

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon sea salt

In a mixing bowl combine the coconut oil, coconut butter, collagen powder and protein powder until smooth. Add in the remaining ingredients and mix on low speed until everything is thick like frosting. Of course the nuts and dried fruit will make it lumpy, but be sure to get it very well mixed.

Line a 8 1/2″ x 11″ pan with waxed paper. Make sure it gets all the way into the corners and up the sides. This can get really messy otherwise!

Pour the coconut mixture into the prepared pan, spreading the mixture evenly. You may need to tap the pan on the counter to settle the mixture into an even thickness. Place the pan into the freezer keeping it level. Freeze for at least an hour.

Remove the pan from the freezer and lift the entire wax paper slab out and place onto a large cutting board. Score the top of the slab into 16 equal bars, then carefully cut each individual bar from the slab.

Store the finished bars in a sealed container in the freezer. You can keep these in the refrigerator if you want them to be a little softer, but don’t leave them out on the counter or you will have pudding instead of a bar.

The macros for one bar (using blueberries) is approximately 21g fat, 4.5g protein, 2.3g net carbs.

low carb keto protein bars fat bomb 2

Low Carb [Keto] Protein Bars [Fat Bomb]
 
Author:
Recipe type: keto
 
healthy fats and proteins in a convenient bar
Ingredients
  • 1 cup coconut oil, very soft
  • 1 cup coconut butter, softened
  • ½ cup grassfed whey vanilla protein powder
  • 1 10g packet Vital Proteins collagen powder
  • ½ cup dried cranberries or dried blueberries
  • 1 cup shredded unsweetened coconut
  • ½ cup crispy pecans or walnuts
  • ½ cup crispy or raw pumpkin seeds
  • ¼ cup hemp hearts
  • 1 Tablespoon chia seeds
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon sea salt
Instructions
  1. In a mixing bowl combine the coconut oil, coconut butter, protein powder and collagen powder.
  2. Mix on low speed until smooth and well combined.
  3. Add the remaining ingredients and mix on low speed until everything is very well combined.
  4. Line a 8½" x 11" pan with waxed paper pushing it into the corners and letting it go all the way up the sides.
  5. Pour the bar mixture into the prepared pan smoothing it out and tapping the pan as needed to make a smooth, even layer.
  6. Place the pan into the freezer keeping it level.
  7. Freeze at least one hour.
  8. Remove from freezer and place the entire slab with the waxed paper onto a cutting board.
  9. Score the top of the slab into 16 equal rectangles.
  10. Carefully cut through the slab into individual bars.
  11. Store in an airtight container or freezer bag in the freezer or refrigerator.

You can purchase the entire Keto Edge Summit for your own reference library. The summit includes more recipes and lots more tips for going keto.

Have you tried keto or low carb? What are your thoughts? Let us know in the comments!

Why I Like the Ultimate Healthy Living Bundle 2016

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It’s that time of year again – the Ultimate Healthy Living Bundle 2016 is now available!!

I love these Ultimate Bundle deals. I’ve purchased a couple of them, such a steal for the price, and I have had fun learning so much about all kinds of topics from essential oils and herbal remedies to DIY projects for my home!

There are products in this year’s bundle for everyone from newlyweds to families to folks just wanting to learn how to get and stay healthy.

Some of the items that really caught my eye:

Essential Oils Revolution 1 from Dr Eric Z: The EOR1 was an amazing resource of interviews from top experts in the Essential Oil field. I listened to almost every one of them last year and learned so much! If you buy this separately it will cost you $97, but it is included in the low bundle price.

Nutrition Reset by Dietitian Cassie: Dietician Cassie is  one of the nutrition experts associated with one of my favorite podcasts, Livin’ La Vida Low Carb Show. She is a registered dietitian who knows all about real food, healthy fats, and how to plan meals to get and stay healthy.

Secrets to a Healthy Metabolism by Maria Emmerich at Keto AdaptedMaria Emmerich has a beautiful cookbook she wrote with Jimmy Moore from Livin La Vida Low Carb. She has amazing low carb/Paleo recipes.

Jumpstart Your Urban Farm by Greg Peterson at Urban Farm: Urban farming (I like to call it MetroFarming) is a topic near and dear to my heart. I’ve been incorporating more edible landscaping and small garden plots and want to learn more!

Planning & Designing the Family Food Garden by Isis Loran at Family Food Garden: Isis gives you printables and design ideas to get gardening at your house.

Mastering the Art of Baking with Coconut Flour by Starlene Stewart at GAPS Diet Journey: Starlene has had a super-informational podcast and website, and she has hands-on experience with healing herself and her family using GAPS and other dietary strategies.

Autism Diet Success Workshop by Julie Matthews at Nourishing Hope: I love to hear about successful strategies to reverse autism. The mainstream says it can’t be done, but we know better! Julie Matthews’ guide is another great resource for families with special needs.

3 Ways to Upgrade Your Kombucha Tea by Dave Lindenbaum at Get Kombucha: I first heard about Dave’s website from his crazy videos about kombucha back about five years ago. He has a big site with lots of information and equipment.

 The sale begins 8am Eastern on Wednesday, September 21st and runs six days to Monday, September 26th at 11:59pm Eastern.

The price for the entire bundle of 58 ebooks & printables, 25 ecourses, videos & audios, and11 bonuses is just $29.97 for PDF format or $39.97 for eReader format.

If you purchase by Thursday, September 22nd at 11.59pm you can get a free eReader upgrade.

The bonuses include some amazing products:

Bonuses – free 1oz bag of Get Kombucha’s custom tea blend, free Mrs Meyer’s laundry supplies, free eye shadow trio from Orglamix, free toothpowder, free maca powder, free muscle balm stick and lip balm, gift certificates from Bloom Naturals and Perfect Supplements, discounts from Trilight Health, and free digital packages from Meal Garden and Experience Life

The Ultimate Healthy Living Bundle 2016 is only available for a short window of time. Order here. buttonplusicons

 

A Brief History of Fat-Free Dieting (series part two)

This is part two of a series looking at overall health in relation to healthy weight.

Part One looked at how a body in balance, or homeostasis, is more likely to be a body able to tolerate stress, recover from illness, and maintain a healthy weight. We know entire communities of healthy, balanced people have existed in the recent past and may still exist today. The question remains – why are so many of us still so unhealthy?

Let’s again look at some history. These examples are discussed in Gary Taubes book Good Calories, Bad Calories:

In 1882 at the University of Göttingen in Germany, a professor of medicine, Wilhelm Ebstein, wrote a paper titled “Obesity and Its Treatment”.  Professor Ebstein had a famous patient, Prince Otto otto von bismarckvon Bismark, who was able to lose 60lbs. in less than a year. Prince Otto followed Professor Ebstein’s diet which banned sugar, sweets and potatoes and limited bread. The diet allowed green vegetables and meat of every kind. Professor Ebstein particularly insisted that fatty foods were crucial to weight loss because they increased satisfaction with meals and decreased fatty tissue accumulation in the dieter. Remember, this was still long enough ago that all meats and vegetables were still what we would today classify as “organic”. It was also still early enough in modern history that industrialized vegetable oils had not become mainstream.

In 1951 Dr. Raymond Greene and six other British doctors published a book titled The Practice of Endocrinology. In their book they outlined a diet remarkably similar to the one Dr. Atkins would publish 20 years later. Dr. Greene and colleagues encouraged their patients to eat meat, fish, poultry, all green vegetables, eggs, cheese and fruits with the exception of bananas and grapes. They advised avoiding anything made with flour, breakfast cereals, potatoes and other white root vegetables, all sweets and foods containing a lot of sugar.

hilde bruch obesity expert

 

In 1957 a German-born American specialist on eating disorders, Dr. Hilde Bruch, wrote the following quote: “The great progress in dietary control of obesity was the recognition that meat was not fat-producing, but that it was the ‘innocent foodstufs’, such as bread and sweets, which lead to obesity.”

 

In the 1960s and 1970s clinical trials were being conducted in Sweden, England, France and the United States studying carbohydrate-restricting diets. These diets were shown to be extremely effective at producing weight loss.

In the 1980s it suddenly became popular to avoid fat and anything containing fat. Entire cookbooksfood pyramid fda and television shows were produced centering on this low-fat craze. Bread, potatoes and pasta became the main dish, the darling of the diet world, while meat, especially red meat, became the villain. Even with more than 100 years of study and success using low carbohydrate diets, suddenly the AMA labeled these diets as “fads”.  Fat suddenly became the cause of heart disease.

Something that Mr. Taubes doesn’t mention that I personally feel is significant is that during the 1970s and 80s the CAFO, concentrated animal feeding operation, became the norm for beef and pork production rather than the historically traditional and biologically normal pasture or free-range method. It is in the CAFO that the meat we eat gets fattened up as efficiently as possible and as quickly as possible. What is the feed that gets meat animals fat quickly? Grain, corn and soy, the very same foods the experts were telling us to eat in order to get thin.

In the 1900s obesity rates in America were very low, less than 1%.  By 1960 they had risen to around 12%. This rate stayed fairly steady up to about 1980 when it began rising. By 2010 obesity rates had skyrocketed to 35%.  Gary Taubes notes “this parallels the years when we were told to stop eating fat and start eating more breads and grains.”

The federal government, the food industry and many physicians and other public health experts took some studies from the 1940s showing a correlation between a high-fat diet and high cholesterol levels that concluded high-risk heart patients should lower their fat intake and decided that the general population should go ahead and do the same. (Remember, blogger Denise Minger’s favorite mantra “correlation does not prove causation”). These experts assumed that if we ate less fat our weights would go down. They thought this because fats contained densely packed calories. What they did not take into consideration was that the composition of the calorie is far more important than the calorie itself. Instead of weight going down the opposite happened. Weights went up, portion sizes went up (because this new way of eating still left us hungry unlike the fattier foods of old), and the actual amount of food eaten also went up since what we were eating was no longer nourishing us very well and we kept craving more. Foods that are lower in fat are naturally higher in carbohydrates. People ate more because without the fat there was no satiety – our bodies didn’t register “full” as easily.

fat free half and halfThe end result is that now everyone just assumes that fat is bad. More and more fat-free foods became available as the food industry leaped to the forefront to “rescue” us from evil fatty foods. Now we have fat-free ice cream, fat-free cookies, fat-free yogurt, we even have fat-free half & half! (How is this possible? I thought the definition of half & half was half cream half milk!) Still obesity rates have gone up and up while the media and public health experts are accusing us of being lazy and cheating!

This makes me furious! Can you tell me one single person who WANTS to be obese?! Often times it is these people accused of being lazy and cheating who are working the hardest to get thin! They literally starve themselves on diets and liquid-fasts of 700 or fewer calories per day and yet they still gain weight!

What are we doing wrong?   ………to be continued………..Part Three is here.

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