Tag Archives: immune system

The Number One Immune Booster – Wellness Wednesday

WW titleWelcome to Wellness Wednesday! Each week I will share an article or recipe as part of the Wellness Wednesday blog hop link-up, and at the end is a place for you to share with us too! Co-hosts for this blog hop include Never Lacking Zeal, Frugal G33k, The Wise Wife and Hudman Honey Farm.  So let’s go!

Immune Boosters

More and more people are hearing about the GAPS diet. GAPS (an acronym for Gut and Psychology Syndrome) is based on Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride’s ground-breaking book Gut And Psychology Syndrome: Natural Treatment for Autism, Dyspraxia, ADD, Dyslexia, ADHD, Depression, Schizophrenia.

Along with priceless information about healing the digestive tract and restoring the gut microbiome she includes her Top Ten list of ways to boost your immune system.

Big Surprise!

Newcomers to the world of real, traditional food will probably be dumbfounded to read that the number one way to support a healthy immune system is with animal fat and cholesterol-rich foods. For over thirty years Americans have been brainwashed to believe fat is bad, fat makes you fat, fat clogs arteries, fat causes heart attacks. Except that it’s all been a big fat lie.

As you begin to absorb the information from Dr. Natasha’s book it begins to make sense how Americans have been in a downward health spiral for the last several decades. We’ve been mistakenly advised to eliminate the very foods that can keep us healthy. Because of this we have put a very heavy burden on our bodies: a burden to create new cells, regulate their growth, create hormones, create barriers to toxins that want to get in, fuel an immune system that needs to patrol for infections and disease - all of this without the proper tools, without the proper building materials. It’s like telling a brick layer to build a wall without using any bricks. You could build a wall with just mortar, but it will not be structurally sound and certainly won’t last as long as a wall built with mortar AND bricks.

#1. Fresh animal fats (from meats and dairy) and cholesterol-rich foods (particularly raw egg yolk)

Animal fats include tallow (beef or lamb fat), lard (pork fat), chicken or goose fat (sometimes called schmaltz), and duck fat; butter, cream and cheese from cows, goats and other dairy animals. Wild caught cold water fish such as salmon and cod also possess healthy fats such as cod liver oil, fish oil and roe.

Animal fats are not made up only of those wrongly demonized saturated fats, but, like all naturally occurring fats, each is a mixture of different percentages of saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated fats. Goose, duck & chicken fat, and lard have generous amounts of monounsaturated fats like those found in olives and avocados.

The health food world has discovered the many useful properties of coconut oil, a saturated fat, and yet they are unwilling to embrace beef or lamb tallow, lard or duck fat because they include saturated fat. Healthfully sourced animal fat is something to be desired in a healthy diet.

Healthy animals make healthy fat.

cows on pasture
Animals living outdoors in ways appropriate for their species, eating the food God created for them to eat, will yield beautiful, clean, healthy fat rich in vitamins and fat soluble activators.

Unhealthy sources of fat include fat from any animal living in confined animal feeding operations (CAFO) fed a steady diet of GMO grains, antibiotics and other inappropriate substances.

Healthy saturated fats provide structural integrity to our cells. Our immune system cells are not exception – all cells need saturated fats. Cholesterol, found in all animal fats, is the key component in several important body functions which include helping our skin manufacture vitamin D from sunshine exposure, and being used by the adrenals to make important hormones, including sex hormones and anti-inflammatory hormones. When we don’t eat cholesterol-rich foods our body must use up precious energy to manufacture it out of the carbohydrates in our diet, and then turn around and use the cholesterol to manufacture everything else. When our adrenal glands are already fatigued due to illness or stress this unnecessary step wears them out even more making us more prone to infections of all kinds.

Animal fats provide complete, fully formed and easily absorbable versions of the key fat soluble vitamins A, E, D and K. Pasture raised eggs, whole clean raw milk and cream, butter, cheese, grassfed beef liver and chicken liver, wild caught cold water fish and fish eggs are all great choices for immune-boosting fat soluble vitamins.

Even though labels may say carrots contain vitamin A, the truth is plant sources of these vitamins are not fully formed and require our bodies to use up energy, enzymes and and other reserves to complete the transformation into usable forms. Again, when our bodies are stressed this conversion is difficult and may not even happen at all. This is especially true for people with digestive disorders. This means no matter how many carrots you eat you just aren’t getting vitamin A – you need to eat foods with fully formed vitamin A to get what you need!

eggs1This blog is for informational purposes only. Some links may be monetized. Thank you for supporting Well Fed Family with your purchases.

Now it’s your turn. Share your number one wellness tip with us on the Wellness Wednesday link up!

 


3 Easy Ways to Support Your Lymph System

3 easy ways to support lymph titleWe all want strong immune systems. Most people have heard about taking vitamin C, or eating garlic, and if you’re up on your GAPS protocol knowledge you know about getting plenty of sunshine, eating fermented foods, and plenty of healthy fats. One often overlooked area of the immune system is the lymph system.

The lymph system is made up of special vessels, nodes and spaces all over your entire body from head to toe. It is filled with a special fluid, called lymph, that starts out as part of your blood, but slowly leaks out of the blood and takes with it anything dangerous or toxic. The lymph fluid holds onto these toxins until they can filter them through the nearest lymph node. The nodes isolate and neutralize the toxins by making special white blood cells. The neutralized toxin is released back into the lymph fluid and excreted with the rest of the body’s waste.  Eventually the lymph fluid travels all around the body and ends up in a special area right behind the heart. It enters the heart through the thoracic duct and the fluid is returned to the circulation system where the whole cycle starts all over again.  Your tonsils, bone marrow, thymus gland and spleen are also a part of the lymphatic system.

When you catch a cold or a sore throat one of the first things you notice, maybe even before you realize you are sick, is swollen lymph nodes. This is because your lymph system is already hard at work trying to fight off disease. It’s important to take care of your lymph system since it is one of our first lines of defense.

We all know our blood circulates on its own, quite rapidly, throughout the body making the trip from head to toe about once every minute or so. The fluid in the lymph system moves much more slowly. It makes the blood look like a Class V rapids in comparison! No, the lymph system is more like the lazy river – except that’s not exactly accurate since rivers flow on their own. The lymph system requires help to flow. You don’t want stagnant lymph, you want it to flow and circulate and clear away the toxins as efficiently as possible. So here are three things you can do every day to move your lymph along.

1. Exercise.  Our lymphatic systems depend on the contraction of our muscles to move along and circulate. Sitting for too long causes the lymph fluid to stagnate. Sometimes this fluid builds up and causes swelling – sometimes in your ankles and lower legs – which is uncomfortable and not very safe either.  Daily exercise helps activate the lymph circulation. Gentle movement like walking or tai chi can be as effective as more strenuous exercise when it comes to moving lymph.

dry brush

dry brush with detachable handle

2. Dry Brushing. Lymph only flows in one direction – toward the heart. So dry brushing done correctly is a great way to move that fluid along where it needs to go. Dry brushing also helps shed dead skin cells, a beauty bonus. To get started purchase a natural bristle brush with a long handle like this one. Before your daily bath or shower is a good time to do it. Start with the bottoms of your feet and cover your entire foot with firm, longish strokes moving evenly up from the foot to lower leg to thigh and hips. Do the same thing with hands moving up toward shoulders, and torso moving from hips and buttocks up toward the heart. Do both feet/legs and both hands/arms. Every stroke should move toward your heart. You can end with reaching the brush to mid back and stroking up over shoulders toward the heart. Then shower or bathe as usual. Dry brushing is most effective when done daily for at least three months.

lemons and oranges

drink the juice from half a lemon

3. Lemon water. The first thing you drink every morning should be something that benefits your health. So put the coffee or sodas, or even milk or juice, on hold while you have a glass of lemon water. Squeeze the juice of half a lemon into a 16oz mug and fill it with warm water. Drink the warm lemon water first thing to give your lymph system a boost as it dumps out all of the toxins it has accumulated from the day before and during the night.

Try these three ideas to nurture your lymph system now. This will help you get ready for all those back-to-school germs by helping to build and boost your immune system.  Share this post with your friends by using the Twitter, Pinterest and Facebook links at the top of the page. We’d love to hear from you, please leave a comment!

This blog is for informational purposes only. Some links may be monetized. Read our full disclosure here. This post was shared with Wellness Wednesdays.