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Why I Like the Ultimate Healthy Living Bundle 2016

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It’s that time of year again – the Ultimate Healthy Living Bundle 2016 is now available!!

I love these Ultimate Bundle deals. I’ve purchased a couple of them, such a steal for the price, and I have had fun learning so much about all kinds of topics from essential oils and herbal remedies to DIY projects for my home!

There are products in this year’s bundle for everyone from newlyweds to families to folks just wanting to learn how to get and stay healthy.

Some of the items that really caught my eye:

Essential Oils Revolution 1 from Dr Eric Z: The EOR1 was an amazing resource of interviews from top experts in the Essential Oil field. I listened to almost every one of them last year and learned so much! If you buy this separately it will cost you $97, but it is included in the low bundle price.

Nutrition Reset by Dietitian Cassie: Dietician Cassie is  one of the nutrition experts associated with one of my favorite podcasts, Livin’ La Vida Low Carb Show. She is a registered dietitian who knows all about real food, healthy fats, and how to plan meals to get and stay healthy.

Secrets to a Healthy Metabolism by Maria Emmerich at Keto AdaptedMaria Emmerich has a beautiful cookbook she wrote with Jimmy Moore from Livin La Vida Low Carb. She has amazing low carb/Paleo recipes.

Jumpstart Your Urban Farm by Greg Peterson at Urban Farm: Urban farming (I like to call it MetroFarming) is a topic near and dear to my heart. I’ve been incorporating more edible landscaping and small garden plots and want to learn more!

Planning & Designing the Family Food Garden by Isis Loran at Family Food Garden: Isis gives you printables and design ideas to get gardening at your house.

Mastering the Art of Baking with Coconut Flour by Starlene Stewart at GAPS Diet Journey: Starlene has had a super-informational podcast and website, and she has hands-on experience with healing herself and her family using GAPS and other dietary strategies.

Autism Diet Success Workshop by Julie Matthews at Nourishing Hope: I love to hear about successful strategies to reverse autism. The mainstream says it can’t be done, but we know better! Julie Matthews’ guide is another great resource for families with special needs.

3 Ways to Upgrade Your Kombucha Tea by Dave Lindenbaum at Get Kombucha: I first heard about Dave’s website from his crazy videos about kombucha back about five years ago. He has a big site with lots of information and equipment.

 The sale begins 8am Eastern on Wednesday, September 21st and runs six days to Monday, September 26th at 11:59pm Eastern.

The price for the entire bundle of 58 ebooks & printables, 25 ecourses, videos & audios, and11 bonuses is just $29.97 for PDF format or $39.97 for eReader format.

If you purchase by Thursday, September 22nd at 11.59pm you can get a free eReader upgrade.

The bonuses include some amazing products:

Bonuses – free 1oz bag of Get Kombucha’s custom tea blend, free Mrs Meyer’s laundry supplies, free eye shadow trio from Orglamix, free toothpowder, free maca powder, free muscle balm stick and lip balm, gift certificates from Bloom Naturals and Perfect Supplements, discounts from Trilight Health, and free digital packages from Meal Garden and Experience Life

The Ultimate Healthy Living Bundle 2016 is only available for a short window of time. Order here. buttonplusicons

 

Number Two Immune Boosting Food – Wellness Wednesday

This blog is for informational purposes only. Some links may be monetized. Thank you for supporting Well Fed Family.

It’s Wellness Wednesday – I’m sharing about another great food for boosting your entire immune system, then at the end there is a link for you to share your own wellness-related blog. Don’t forget to check out the other fine folks who’ve linked up here too!

Immune Boosters

Recently I gave you the Number One immune boosting food – you can read about it here. Today I’m revealing the food in the Number Two slot. This one also plays a powerful role in rebuilding and maintaining a healthy immune system. If you were surprised by #1 then this one may also surprise you. This list is from Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride, M.D., is a neurologist, and creator of the GAPS diet, a successful nutritional protocol used in healing both physical and neurological disorders such as autism, auto-immune diseases and heart disease.

cold pressed oils collage

Immunity Booster #2: Cold pressed oils such as olive oil, fish oils, nut and seed oils

While fresh animal fats and cholesterol-rich foods are stellar when it comes to building strong cells and creating important stress-coping hormones, there are many other healthy fats that we should incorporate into our daily diet.

We’re all familiar with extra virgin olive oil, and many of you are also aware of the benefits of fish oils (especially cod liver oil). What you may not have heard about are which of the nut and seed oils truly are healthy, and which ones are toxic.

Just as with animal fats, the fats from plants are also mixtures of saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated – there is no naturally occurring fat that is only one type.Coconut, palm kernel, and cocoa butter are all rich sources of plant-based saturated fats. Olive, avocado, almond, pecan, cashew and peanut all provide generous amounts of monounsaturated fats. Cold water fish oils like cod and salmon; along with flaxseed,  non-GMO soy, canola, corn and safflower are primarily polyunsaturated.

Just as with animal fats, the sources of plant fats are extremely important. Many seed oils come from genetically modified plants and carry with them the pesticide and herbicide residues as well as other questionable factors.  Nearly all soy, corn and canola in the U.S. is GMO.

Unlike animal fats, however, there are many methods of extracting fats and oils from plants. The extraction method chosen is extremely important – in fact, even if your plant source is 100% biodynamically-beyond-organic, but you extract the oil incorrectly you will have ruined it, made it toxic.  Care must be taken when extracting plant oils. If powerful chemical solvents are used to extract the oils then you can be sure the oils will retain the toxins from these chemicals. When high heat methods are used for extraction, especially on the fragile polyunsaturated oils, these oils are damaged and turn rancid.  This is why the #2 Immune Booster must come from cold pressed oils.

Any oil that is primarily polyunsaturated should be kept chilled and stored in a dark container to protect the fragile nature of this type of oil. If you find a polyunsaturated oil in a clear container sitting out on a grocery shelf just leave it there! It is already rancid and has no place in your body. It’s not an immunity booster – it’s just a big bust!

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So to summarize: Choose your plant-based oils from organic, cold-pressed sources. Read the labels for any expiration date. Keep polyunsaturated oils refrigerated and use them up before they expire. Never heat polyunsaturated oils, keep them for salad dressings or adding to smoothies. Coconut oil and olive oil can be kept at room temperature, but it is still important to keep olive oil in dark containers as the enzymes are light sensitive. Saturated and monounsaturated plant oils can be used for cooking, but save the higher heat applications for the mostly saturated ones.

Now it’s your turn! Share with us on Wellness Wednesday – here’s all the info…


The Number One Immune Booster – Wellness Wednesday

WW titleWelcome to Wellness Wednesday! Each week I will share an article or recipe as part of the Wellness Wednesday blog hop link-up, and at the end is a place for you to share with us too! Co-hosts for this blog hop include Never Lacking Zeal, Frugal G33k, The Wise Wife and Hudman Honey Farm.  So let’s go!

Immune Boosters

More and more people are hearing about the GAPS diet. GAPS (an acronym for Gut and Psychology Syndrome) is based on Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride’s ground-breaking book Gut And Psychology Syndrome: Natural Treatment for Autism, Dyspraxia, ADD, Dyslexia, ADHD, Depression, Schizophrenia.

Along with priceless information about healing the digestive tract and restoring the gut microbiome she includes her Top Ten list of ways to boost your immune system.

Big Surprise!

Newcomers to the world of real, traditional food will probably be dumbfounded to read that the number one way to support a healthy immune system is with animal fat and cholesterol-rich foods. For over thirty years Americans have been brainwashed to believe fat is bad, fat makes you fat, fat clogs arteries, fat causes heart attacks. Except that it’s all been a big fat lie.

As you begin to absorb the information from Dr. Natasha’s book it begins to make sense how Americans have been in a downward health spiral for the last several decades. We’ve been mistakenly advised to eliminate the very foods that can keep us healthy. Because of this we have put a very heavy burden on our bodies: a burden to create new cells, regulate their growth, create hormones, create barriers to toxins that want to get in, fuel an immune system that needs to patrol for infections and disease - all of this without the proper tools, without the proper building materials. It’s like telling a brick layer to build a wall without using any bricks. You could build a wall with just mortar, but it will not be structurally sound and certainly won’t last as long as a wall built with mortar AND bricks.

#1. Fresh animal fats (from meats and dairy) and cholesterol-rich foods (particularly raw egg yolk)

Animal fats include tallow (beef or lamb fat), lard (pork fat), chicken or goose fat (sometimes called schmaltz), and duck fat; butter, cream and cheese from cows, goats and other dairy animals. Wild caught cold water fish such as salmon and cod also possess healthy fats such as cod liver oil, fish oil and roe.

Animal fats are not made up only of those wrongly demonized saturated fats, but, like all naturally occurring fats, each is a mixture of different percentages of saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated fats. Goose, duck & chicken fat, and lard have generous amounts of monounsaturated fats like those found in olives and avocados.

The health food world has discovered the many useful properties of coconut oil, a saturated fat, and yet they are unwilling to embrace beef or lamb tallow, lard or duck fat because they include saturated fat. Healthfully sourced animal fat is something to be desired in a healthy diet.

Healthy animals make healthy fat.

cows on pasture
Animals living outdoors in ways appropriate for their species, eating the food God created for them to eat, will yield beautiful, clean, healthy fat rich in vitamins and fat soluble activators.

Unhealthy sources of fat include fat from any animal living in confined animal feeding operations (CAFO) fed a steady diet of GMO grains, antibiotics and other inappropriate substances.

Healthy saturated fats provide structural integrity to our cells. Our immune system cells are not exception – all cells need saturated fats. Cholesterol, found in all animal fats, is the key component in several important body functions which include helping our skin manufacture vitamin D from sunshine exposure, and being used by the adrenals to make important hormones, including sex hormones and anti-inflammatory hormones. When we don’t eat cholesterol-rich foods our body must use up precious energy to manufacture it out of the carbohydrates in our diet, and then turn around and use the cholesterol to manufacture everything else. When our adrenal glands are already fatigued due to illness or stress this unnecessary step wears them out even more making us more prone to infections of all kinds.

Animal fats provide complete, fully formed and easily absorbable versions of the key fat soluble vitamins A, E, D and K. Pasture raised eggs, whole clean raw milk and cream, butter, cheese, grassfed beef liver and chicken liver, wild caught cold water fish and fish eggs are all great choices for immune-boosting fat soluble vitamins.

Even though labels may say carrots contain vitamin A, the truth is plant sources of these vitamins are not fully formed and require our bodies to use up energy, enzymes and and other reserves to complete the transformation into usable forms. Again, when our bodies are stressed this conversion is difficult and may not even happen at all. This is especially true for people with digestive disorders. This means no matter how many carrots you eat you just aren’t getting vitamin A – you need to eat foods with fully formed vitamin A to get what you need!

eggs1This blog is for informational purposes only. Some links may be monetized. Thank you for supporting Well Fed Family with your purchases.

Now it’s your turn. Share your number one wellness tip with us on the Wellness Wednesday link up!

 


Simple Squash Soup with Sage

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One of my privileges is to be a Weston A Price Foundation chapter leader.  I get to meet lots of friendly people, spread the word about healthy food, and schedule interesting speakers who teach us about all kinds of interesting things. Last month my friend Pam Wesley, who is a certified GAPS practitioner at Flourish Nutrition Centre, spoke to our chapter about the differences between the GAPS diet and the traditional diets of the Weston A Price Foundation. She also cooked this amazing soup and brought it to share with everyone.

I made the soup this weekend and shared some with a neighbor and shared the rest with my chapter co-leader, Steve Moreau, when he came over for dinner so we could plan out the chapter activities for the next couple of months.

Usually when I make soups from winter squashes I use butternut, but Pam had used acorn squash which gave the soup a different texture. I got wild and crazy at the grocery store and bought a buttercup squash just to try it out. I’d never had one before and turns out I’ve been missing something great – the buttercup flesh is thick and velvety when it is cooked and the soup came out so creamy!

squash at publix with labels

This soup is appropriate for the maintenance stage of the GAPS diet, or if you leave out the cream you can have it during the intro stage as well. The egg yolks are optional, but add extra vitamins and minerals.

Simple Squash Soup with Sage

5 Tablespoons sweet cream butter

1 medium yellow onion, diced

2 lbs fresh winter squash, peeled and cubed

4 cups homemade chicken stock

3 egg yolks

1 cup heavy cream

fresh sage, minced

sea salt

freshly ground pepper

Melt 2 tablespoons of the butter in a heavy bottomed Dutch oven. Add the onion and saute until tender. Add the squash and the stock, simmer until the squash is tender, about 20 minutes.

Use a blender, food processor or immersion blender to puree the soup to a velvety smooth texture. Return to the pan. Beat together the egg yolks and the cream and add to the soup. Heat gently but do not boil. Add sea salt and pepper to taste. Sprinkle with fresh sage and swirl in the remaining 3 tablespoons of butter and serve.

Simple Squash Soup with Sage
 
Author:
Recipe type: soup
 
This GAPS friendly soup is delicious enough to serve to company.
Ingredients
  • 5 Tablespoons sweet cream butter
  • 1 medium yellow onion, diced
  • 2 lbs fresh winter squash, peeled and cubed
  • 4 cups homemade chicken stock
  • 3 egg yolks
  • 1 cup heavy cream (preferably raw, not ultra-pasteurized)
  • fresh sage, minced
  • sea salt
  • pepper
Instructions
  1. Melt 2 Tablespoons of butter in a large pot.
  2. Add the onion and saute until tender.
  3. Add the squash and the stock, simmer until the squash is tender, about 20 minutes.
  4. Use a blender, food processor or immersion blender to puree the soup to a velvety smooth texture.
  5. Return soup to the pan.
  6. Beat together the egg yolks and the cream in a separate bowl, and add to the soup.
  7. Heat gently but do not boil.
  8. Add sea salt and pepper to taste.
  9. Sprinkle with fresh sage and swirl in the remaining 3 tablespoons of butter and serve.

You can use the social media buttons at the top to Pin, Tweet or share this recipe with someone you know. Leave us a comment or question about GAPS or soup making by using the “reply” link at the top.

This blog is for informational purposes only. Some links may be monetized.

This recipe was shared with Wildcrafting Wednesday #163

 

 

Wise Traditions 2013 Day Two

Wise Traditions 2013 Day Two  I’m just doing a synopsis of everything instead of in-depth on one thing today:

First talk was by Chris Masterjohn: Fat-soluble vitamins in the prevention of heart disease

He gave a lengthy description of the fat-soluble vitamins A, D & K and talked about how they are best absorbed from true fully-formed sources that are found only in animal foods including fatty fish, butter, eggs and the fat of animals living out of doors. K2 is also found in fermented foods.  Then he described how blood clots form and how arteries get clogged (It’s not what you think – best quote of the talk “Arteries are nothing like pipes!” Plaque occurs underneath the lining of the blood vessel and pushes the artery wall out and backward (not narrower) until it eventually ruptures. The rupture then fills with more plaque and only after successive ruptures does the artery become distorted and narrow. Most of the plaque is made from damaged polyunsaturated fats that were captured and capped off to prevent oxidative damage until the body could successfully eliminate them. Trouble is unhealthy people can’t eliminate damaged fats so they continue to pile up and pile up eventually rupturing the artery.

The fat-soluble vitamins protect by allowing special proteins to bind with calcium and direct it out of the blood and soft tissues and into the bones and teeth where it belongs. Vitamins A&D are both important. One without the other can become toxic, they work together. Vitamin K is supported by A&D. They all work to keep us healthy.

Second session was Kaayla Daniel, author of The Whole Soy Story, who has written a new book on bone broth which will be out next year. Kaayla gave a long history of gelatin and canned soups and eventually got down to explaining about the good things in broth which include the following: Gelatin, collagen, cartilage, marrow, proteoglycans (a new word for me that means essential sugars). Broth is useful in forming healthy bone matrix, keeping healthy joints, speeding wound healing, curing some forms of cancer, and curing infections.

Kate Rheaume bleue

Kate Rheaume-Bleue

Kate Rheaume-Bleue was the third presenter I heard today. She has a wonderful new book called Vitamin K2 and the Calcium Paradox: How a Little Known Vitamin Could Save Your Life.  She explained the new research showing those who take calcium supplements are dying of calcified arteries, heart attack and stroke. “Research being done is raising questions that can’t be answered by the research being done.”  Turns out we are calcifying ourselves to death because we are deficient in the fat-soluble vitamin K2. This vitamin is essential – meaning we have to eat it because we cannot manufacture it. But industrial farming and CAFOs have depleted it from our food supply, we eat far less fermented foods than before, and trans fats block K2 activity making a ‘demented’ form of K2 we can’t use.  In factcrowded teeth are almost entirely caused by K2 deficiency during growth years. Women who eat more cheese while they are pregnant (cheese is a good source of K2) will have children with better teeth. K2 takes calcium and puts it where it belongs – in the bones, not in the soft tissues. K2 also counteracts the effects of menopause, heals varicose veins and works as an anti-wrinkle substance. Good food sources of K2 are natto, goose liver, gouda and brie cheese, egg yolk, butter, chicken liver, chicken meat, ground beef, bacon, calf liver, sauerkraut, raw milk, salmon, fish eggs, butter oil and ghee (all animal sources need to be grassfed for optimal K2).

Finally I heard a heartfelt presentation from Kim Schuette of Biodynamic Wellness on the Recovery from Bipolar Disorder, Epilepsy and Type 1 Diabetes. Kim explained how the Affordable Healthcare Act was depending on healthy young people to sign up in order to offset the expense of caring for the aging patients. However the government did not take into account the rocketing rise in the rate of mental health issues afflicting our younger population. 150,000 new cases of epilepsy are diagnosed daily, type 1 diabetes rates have risen 23% from 2001 to 2009.  Strong mental health begins with a strong and healthy gut flora population. But many things damage the gut including improperly prepared grains, pasteurized dairy, sugar, toxic metals and chemicals, antibiotics and chlorinated water. Damaged gut wall eventually results in leaky gut, immune system overload and eventually allergies. The only way to heal is to eliminate the offending items, nourish the body with real food, detox from the ordeal and repair the gut. Nourishing foods include fats as the foundation of all healthy hormones and cell membranes, minerals that act as catalysts to assist the body in utilizing the vitamins, detoxing our bodies and assisting the liver to clean it out, exercising to stimulate the lymph system and repairing with more healthy fats.  Early intervention is always best. The GAPS diet is helpful in doing all of these steps to recovery. Kim then went on to relate four different case studies from her own patients. One teenage girl had bipolar at age 9 and was considered a hopeless case by her doctor. She is now completely healed and living a normal life. Another young boy at age 2 had seizures and went blind and his parents were told to institutionalize him. He is now on the path to wellness, has regained his sight and is able to talk and interact with his family. One young lady was cured of her type 1 diabetes and is now completely off her insulin.

I love hearing the amazing stories of healing and hope given by the wonderful presenters. Tomorrow is the final day. More exciting information to come!