Tag Archives: family

cinco de mayo collage titles

Cinco de Mayo: Real Food Recipe Round-up

cinco de mayo collage titles

Cinco de Mayo falls on a Thursday this year. Perfect for a fun family dinner to celebrate all the fabulous tastes of Mexico! No need to go out; you can make it at home with real food ingredients and the recipes linked below!

Not a biggie holiday in Mexico, (and also NOT Mexican Independence Day) this day marks the Mexican army’s victory over a much bigger and more well-armed French army intent on claiming more territory for France.

In America, Cinco de Mayo has become a day to celebrate Mexican culture and food. If you can’t travel to LA, Chicago or Houston where the largest Cinco de Mayo celebrations occur, you can have fun making delicious Mexican-inspired food at home with your family!

Here’s a Round UP of some of our own Well Fed Family Mexican-inspired favorites followed by several more from some other fantastic blogs!

If you start it by Tuesday morning you can have delicious lacto-fermented salsa ready for dinner Thursday evening!

Make your own nourishing whole grain flour tortillas with our BREADS DVD

DIY Taco Seasoning is frugal and healthy. No more MSG!

Easy Guacamole your kids can make!

Taco Stew is a family favorite at our house.

Fish Tacos with Chipotle Sauce brings a little California to your table.

Irish Nachos – just for fun, or for anyone who can’t eat corn chips!

Chipotle Spiced Meatloaf (with optional organ meats) for some major nutrient density.

Slow Cooker Mexican Corn and Potato Chowder from Don’t Waste the Crumbs is super frugal!

Nourishing Black Beans from Radiant Life

Mexican Rice from Modern Alternative Mama

Salsa Verde from Deep Roots at Home

No-rolling Required Sourdough Tortillas from Traditional Cooking School

Homemade Corn Tortillas from The Kitch’n (only two ingredients!)

Mexican Spinach Casserole from Cave Man Keto (because even people on ketogenic diets need to celebrate!)

Plantain Tortillas from Zenbelly Catering (for you grain-free/Paleo people!)

Slow-Cooker Carnitas from Paleo Foodie People

Paleo Coconut-Lime Tres Leches Cake from Bare Root Girl

And there you have it! Over a dozen real food recipes for your family’s feast!

What is your favorite Mexican food? Leave your answer in the comments!

5 ways to bless your family titles

5 Ways to Bless Your Family, Your Budget and Your Community

 This blog is for informational purposes. Some links may be monetized. Thank you for supporting Well Fed Family with your purchases. 

5 ways to bless your family titles

 

Take This Short Quiz

  1. What is the number one thing you can do as a family to improve your general health?
  1. What is a good way to connect with your teenagers?
  1. What is the most important thing the average person can do to make the American food system healthier and more sustainable?
  1. Name one thing can an individual do to become more self-sufficient and less dependent on a fluctuating, unstable economy?
  1. What activity can you do with young children to engage them in learning concepts in math and science even when they don’t usually enjoy those subjects?

The answers:

  1. cook 2. cook 3. cook 4. cook 5. cook

 Cooking vs Watching Cooking

Two people (both grandmothers!) in the last week have told me “I don’t cook!” Way too many people in my classes over the years have admitted they rarely or never cook. In fact Americans spend less time on average cooking each day than people in any other country! The average time spent cooking per day (not per meal, per DAY!) is 27 minutes – less time than it takes to watch The Next Food Network Star (what is up with this fascination of watching people cook? More people watch cooking than are actually doing cooking, and then when the show is over they still don’t have anything to eat!)

 It’s Healthier

Cooking at home is healthier. When you don’t cook you make yourself vulnerable to the big corporations who make all the ready-to-eat food you have to buy. Unless you spend big bucks to buy your meals from a local restaurant where the chef grows his own organic vegetables and carefully sources his ingredients from local farms, you are most likely eating a lot more refined sugar, industrial oils, and highly processed salt than you normally would if you cooked your own food. Corporations also use all kinds of chemical ingredients not available to the home cook. These chemical ingredients make their food last longer and look fresher than it actually is.

 Teens Like It

Cooking (and eating) together connects you as a family. Teens are social creatures, and they are also usually hungry creatures. :) Bringing them into the kitchen to prepare a meal is a way to get them to interact and be social with everyone who is involved in the meal preparation process. The shared experiences can build family bonds. Eating together a meal you have prepared gives a safe place for conversation, listening and sharing together.

 It Connects Us

Cooking connects you with your food and its origins. We were making homemade pizza as part of a Sunday school lesson and I had brought fresh oregano, parsley, and basil from my garden to use. One young 5th grade girl, already surprised that you could actually make a pizza, freaked out saying “why do you have weeds? How do you know those are safe to eat?” I said, “I grew these. They came from my garden. Where do you think food comes from?” and she replied, “I don’t know. The store has it.”

When we cook at home from fresh ingredients we are connecting in a small way to the rest of the community that grows and raises our food. We gain a new perspective on food when we see a list of raw ingredients get transformed into a meal. Growing something that you eat, or buying directly from a farmer, can bring even stronger connections. Real food doesn’t come in neat boxes, shrink wrapped for microwaving. Buying pre-prepared, pre-wrapped meals separates us from the reality of real food. Cooking at home from fresh ingredients creates more demand for real food while reducing the waste and high cost inherent in the processed food system.

 It’s Budget Friendly

Knowing how to cook gives you power over your budget. The illusion of the “value meal” keeps many people trapped eating expensive yet unhealthy food. Being able to cook for yourself means you can eat higher quality ingredients for less money. It means you can cook a little extra to freeze for later or to eat the next day for lunch instead of eating out. Knowing how to cook helps you be more frugal like when you use the bones for broth, leftover vegetables for soup, or freeze over ripe fruit for smoothies.

 It’s Educational

Teaching your children to cook opens up a new world for them. Measuring and counting, doubling a recipe, figuring out what makes bread rise, what makes pickles sour, seeing liquid cream transform into solid butter, comparing the taste of salt vs. sugar – all of this can bring math and science alive. Tactile experiences like kneading bread, cracking eggs, tearing lettuce, stirring batter, or chopping vegetables can be rewarding for busy little hands. And as your children grow and develop new skills in the kitchen you are giving them the gift of self-sufficiency for when they become adults.

Tell us your reasons for cooking! Leave a comment here or on our Facebook page!

A Merrier World

Rome 03

 

Wishing you all the blessings of good food, song and good cheer during the Christmas season!

Leave us a comment sharing your favorite Christmas blessings – what are you thankful for this year?

This blog is for informational purposes only. Some links may be monetized. Thank you for supporting Well Fed Family with your purchases.

 

Meaningful Meals

*Welcome Amy as she contributes her blog post today!

Well Fed Family is together this week for our annual Cousins Camp on Lake Martin in Alabama.  While the emphasis for the week is reuniting with family, food plays a big part.  We spent time together planning the menu and purchasing food. Together we will prepare it and, most importantly, eat it.  All of this is done in fellowship together.  As we nurture our relationships and build each other up, we are also nurturing our bodies and making them stronger.  Healthy food, joyful fellowship, and thankful hearts contribute to good digestion, which creates healthy bodies.  One might say it’s a beautiful cycle, as a healthy body is better able to participate in joyful fellowship, have a thankful heart, and digest food well.  While we don’t have ultimate or complete control over our health, we are certainly having a good time doing what we can!

grilled chicken platter

Rora Valley Farms grilled chicken

Lee and I thought it would be fun to blog this week about our meals, and maybe share a recipe or two.  We will definitely have photos!  We based much of the menu on what our mother will be receiving in her CSA box this week, other seasonal foods, and special dietary needs  (some folks are currently gluten free).  We are looking forward to catfish, grilled pork chops, lamb burgers, grilled chicken, and everyone’s favorite grilled hamburgers.  Some of our sides will include corn on the cob, collard greens, potato salad, green beans, quinoa, asparagus, Nourishing Traditions baked beans, and roasted potatoes.

grilled chicken dinner from cousins camp

grilled chicken, sprouted brown rice, sauteed squash and leeks

Our first night’s feast was simple: grilled chicken, sprouted brown rice, and squash.  In fact, it sounds kind of boring.  But this was the meal that gave us the idea for this series.  When we thanked the Lord for those who prepared our food, it suddenly dawned on us that we could associate a name and face with each and every dish on our table.   Noah Sanders, of Rora Valley Farm, raised and processed our chicken.  He has a wife and baby; his family is just beginning.  Our mother has supported his farm and family for at least three years now.  The sprouted brown rice came from To Your Health Sprouted Flours, a flourishing company from right here in Alabama owned by Peggy Sutton.  We have been purchasing from Peggy since maybe 2007, back when she was still selling baked goods.  And finally, our squash and leeks came fresh from last week’s Randle Farms CSA box.  This well established family farm provides this community with pastured meats, lots of delicious vegetables, and amazing strawberries and blueberries. (I would also like to mention the farmer who provided our delicious raw milk, but …)  Now mindful of these connections, dinner was even tastier.

 Better is a dinner of herbs where love is

 than a fattened ox and hatred with it.

Proverbs 15:17

What is it that makes a meal delicious?  This week Well Fed Family is reminded that there are several components of a meal that work together to make it delicious, memorable, and nourishing.  Of course the food itself should be fresh and nutritious.  But there is much more.  Enjoying a meal with loved ones is very important; it’s always better to eat with someone than all alone.  Preparing the meal in joyful fellowship with one another also matters.  An atmosphere of joyfulness and thankfulness sets the stage for good health.   But let’s not forget where it begins: on the farm, with those families who intentionally raise or grow your food in a spirit of joyfulness and thankfulness, allowing the animals and crops to flourish in a way that glorifies the Lord.

Some links may be monetized. This blog is for informational purposes. 

Mom’s Sour Cream Coffee Cake

Amy and I both owe a big heartfelt thanks to our mom for teaching us to cook. Some of my earliest memories are in the kitchens of all the different places we lived.  Playing under the table while mom cooked dinner, licking beaters from the mixer after she made a cake, helping roll the Snickerdoodles in the sugar or press the crisscross marks into peanut butter cookies.  As we grew older she encouraged us to find recipes we wanted to try on our own. She even  encouraged us to enter the Girl Scout Bake Off. I remember when I was in 6th grade she bought ingredients for three or four pound cakes and let me practice before the big event. I actually won a prize!  In high school she occasionally assigned us times to plan and make dinner, which is when I think I first tried making lasagne and french bread.

By the time I went to college I was a confident enough cook that I wasn’t forced to rely on frozen dinners or the campus cafeteria. My roommate and I actually used the kitchen in our college apartment and had friends over for homecooked meals.  Cooking and eating at home saved us a lot of money when my husband and I first married and had to live on graduate student salaries. Now our kids are becoming skilled cooks in their own right. What a wonderful legacy!

Kristy Gilliland, Jane, LeeOf course there were cakes every year – homemade ones which have spoiled me for any other kind of cake. I remember a big Pink Lemonade Cake with marshmallow flowers, and a Chocolate Buttermilk Layer Cake on my 16th birthday. One family favorite I want to share with you in honor of Mother’s Day is our Mom’s Sour Cream Coffee Cake. I can remember eating this cake as a very young girl. It is one of our Dad’s favorites, too. It goes well with a cup of coffee, or a big glass of milk. If no one is looking you can even lick the cinnamon sugar crumbs off the plate when you are done.

Mom's Sour Cream Coffee Cake
 
Author:
Recipe type: dessert
 
This moist spicy cake has been a family favorite since we were little girls.
Ingredients
  • 1 cup butter, softened
  • 1½ cups plus 2 Tblsp cane sugar
  • 2 eggs, slightly beaten
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 2 cups sifted flour
  • 1 tsp baking powder (non aluminum)
  • ½ tsp baking soda (non aluminum)
  • ½ cup chopped pecans
  • ½ tsp cinnamon
Instructions
  1. Mix 2 Tblsp of sugar with the cinnamon in a small bowl and set aside.
  2. Butter a 9" bundt pan or angel cake pan.
  3. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.
  4. In a mixer, cream together the butter and remaining 1½ cups sugar.
  5. Add the eggs, sour cream and vanilla to the butter mixture, mixing well.
  6. Blend in the flour, baking powder and baking soda, mixing until smooth.
  7. Spoon half of the batter into the prepared pan.
  8. Sprinkle half of the nuts and half of the cinnamon sugar evenly onto the batter. Spoon in the remaining batter.
  9. Sprinkle the remaining nuts and cinnamon sugar on the top.
  10. Bake in preheated 375 degree oven for 50 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean.
  11. Cool the cake for 20 minutes in the pan before removing from the pan.

 

We’d love to hear your memories of mom, share your favorite recipe, or tell us how you first learned to cook.  Leave us a comment in the comment box, or click on the “leave a reply” link at the top near the title of this article. Tell us how you are leaving a legacy of cooking for your kids.

Sierra Exif JPEG

 

 

 

 

 

Some links may be monetized. This blog is for informational purposes only.