A Merrier World

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Wishing you all the blessings of good food, song and good cheer during the Christmas season!

Leave us a comment sharing your favorite Christmas blessings – what are you thankful for this year?

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12 Health Secrets from a Real Food Pioneer

This post is featured on the Traditional Cooking School website.

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pictured: Amy Knowles, Sally Fallon Morrell, and Lee Burdett at the Wise Traditions 2014 in Indianapolis, IN

I was privileged again this year to attend Wise Traditions, the annual conference for the Weston A. Price Foundation. I am always inspired by the speakers, exhibits and the wonderful meals. I come home recharged and motivated to try new things, and to keep sharing the message of good health. I’m thankful for WAPF President Sally Fallon Morell, and her team, who put together these weekends overflowing with information.

In this post, I’m sharing Sally’s own health secrets, given as part of the closing ceremonies for the 2014 conference in Indianapolis. These 12 points represent many of the same key ideas that made an impact on my own healthy journey when I turned away from current mainstream ideas. Read More here….

This blog is for informational purposes only. Some links may be monetized. Thank you for supporting Well Fed Family.

Fa La La Lasagne

lasagne slice with titlesIt was Christmas Potluck time at the martial arts school where my son takes Kung Fu. He really wanted to go, but I was too busy to cook anything for him to take, plus I wasn’t even going to go myself.  I told him he could go if he would make something himself to take. I didn’t think it was fair to send a bottomless pit teenage boy to scarf up everybody else’s food without bringing anything to share! He chose lasagne even after I told him the sauce takes a half hour to simmer and then it still has to bake almost an hour. He loves lasagne.

Being a homeschool mom I grabbed the teaching moment. I handed him the recipe and told him to look and see what we already had and then make a shopping list. Then I took him to Publix and made him shop. He’s 16 and the time when he is out on his own is drawing nearer and nearer no matter how much I don’t want it to come. I want him to be self-sufficient so I’ve taught him how to sort laundry and use the washing machine. I’ve had him with me in the kitchen since he was big enough to pull up a stool and stand next to me at the counter. He’s been cooking independently since he was six. He’s learning to drive, to balance a checkbook and manage a savings account. He can operate the vacuum, wash dishes, and clean the bathroom, mow the lawn, run the string trimmer and build a compost pile. Planning a menu, grocery shopping and cooking from scratch to share with others is something else grownups need to be able to do. He jumped into the project happily.

lasagne and leo with captionShopping, prepping the ingredients and making the sauce were all easy, he only needed a little help when it came to actual assembly of the layers. One of my tricks is to only cook the lasagne noodles halfway so they are pliable but they don’t fall apart when you pick them up. They continue to cook inside the casserole during baking so you don’t end up with crunchy pasta. It also takes a little experience knowing how much to use in each layer so you don’t end up with something leftover when it’s all finished, or run out of something before you’re done.

So here’s the recipe for my lasagne. I’ve been making it since I was 16. I’m glad to pass the torch along to my son. I have fond memories of making this lasagne and sharing it with my own friends and family; I hope he will build some memories sharing meals with his own friends and family, too.

Lasagne

Ingredients

1 lb grassfed ground beef
1 small onion, chopped
3 Tblsp olive oil, divided use
1 15oz can diced tomatoes
2 6oz cans tomato paste
2 cups filtered water
1 Tblsp chopped parsley
2 tsp sea salt
1 tsp Italian seasoning
1 tsp honey
2 cloves garlic, pressed
1/2 tsp freshly ground pepper
1 tsp dried oregano
8 oz lasagne noodles
1 lb whole milk ricotta cheese
8 oz mozarella, shredded
1 cup freshly grated Parmesan

Preparation

In a large, heavy pan brown the ground beef and onion in 2 Tablespoons of the olive oil. Add the diced tomatoes, tomato paste, water, parsley, salt, honey, garlic, pepper, oregano and Italian seasoning. Simmer the sauce for 30 minutes, uncovered, stirring occasionally.

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Cook the lasagne noodles for about half the time as directed adding the remaining tablespoon of olive oil to the cooking water to keep them from sticking together. Drain.

In a 9×13 casserole pan spread 1 cup of the sauce. Alternate layers of noodles, sauce, ricotta, mozzarella and Parmesan – ending with sauce, mozzarella, Parmesan.

Bake at 350 degrees for 40-50 minutes until lightly browned and bubbling. Allow to stand 15 minutes before cutting into squares to serve.
yield: 8 servings

Lasagne
Author: 
Recipe type: casserole
Cuisine: Italian
Serves: 8 squares
 
Making lasagne from scratch is a great activity for teens to do with each other or with the family.
Ingredients
  • 1 lb grassfed ground beef
  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • 3 Tablespoons olive oil, divided
  • 1 15oz can diced tomatoes
  • 2 6oz cans tomato paste
  • 2 cups filtered water
  • 1 Tablespoon chopped parsley
  • 2 teaspoons sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon Italian seasoning
  • 1 teaspoon honey
  • 2 cloves garlic, pressed
  • ½ teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 8 oz lasagne noodles
  • 1 lb whole milk ricotta cheese
  • 8 oz mozzarella cheese, shredded
  • 1 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
Instructions
  1. Add 2 Tablespoons of olive oil to a large heavy pan over medium heat.
  2. Brown the ground beef and onion.
  3. Add the dice tomatoes, tomato paste, water, parsley, salt, honey, garlic, pepper, oregano and Italian seasoning.
  4. Simmer the sauce, uncovered, for 30 minutes stirring occasionally.
  5. Cook the lasagne noodles for half the time as directed, adding the remaining 1 Tablespoon of olive oil to the cooking water to keep the pasta from sticking together.
  6. Drain the pasta.
  7. Spread 1 cup of the sauce in the bottom of a 9x13 casserole pan.
  8. Alternate layers of noodles, sauce, ricotta, mozzarella and Parmesan - ending with sauce, mozzarella, Parmesan.
  9. Bake at 350 degrees for 40-50 minutes until lightly browned and bubbling.
  10. Allow to stand for 15 minutes before cutting into squares to serve.

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Do you have teens? How are you preparing them for living on their own? Do they like to cook? Share your stories with us here or come leave a reply on Facebook.

This blog is for informational purposes only. Some links may be monetized. Thank you for supporting Well Fed Family with your purchases.

Smoky Roasted Brussels Sprouts

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People have a love/hate relationship with Brussels sprouts. I happen to be in the love camp. We were in Auburn, AL, recently and went out to eat for my daughter’s birthday. They had Brussels sprouts on the menu. They were crispy, salty and smoky and I’ve been thinking about them ever since. I’ve come pretty close to the flavor with this recipe. This is so simple, really, that it’s hardly a recipe.

I started with a pound of fresh Brussels sprouts which I washed, trimmed off the bottoms and outer leaves, and sliced in half. The sprouts went in a big bowl, and then I melted about 2 Tablespoons of bacon grease. Yes, I save bacon grease – and you should too! Lard and bacon grease are stable fats for cooking, have a nice balance of monounsaturated and saturated fats, and if your pigs lived outdoors they’re also a source of vitamin D. Anyhow, back to the recipe – I sprinkled a couple of teaspoons of Smoky Salt Blend over the sprouts, drizzled on the bacon grease and tossed it all together. Everything got dumped into a stoneware pan (a cast iron skillet would work too) and roasted at 425 degrees for about 25 minutes until they were caramelized on the outside and tender on the inside.

The Smoky Salt Blend is one of about a dozen homemade salt/spice blend recipes from the Practical Paleo cookbook. I love Practical Paleo not just for the recipes, but for the great information, too. This blend is 1 Tblsp chipotle powder, 1 Tblsp smoked paprika, 1 Tblsp onion powder, 1/2 Tblsp cinnamon, 1 Tblsp sea salt, and 1/2 Tblsp black pepper. I think it would be just as good if you subbed garlic powder for the cinnamon.

I made sure there were a few Brussels sprouts leftover and had myself a Paleo-style breakfast this morning. I fried up one slice of bacon, reheated the sprouts in the pan and crumbled the bacon over top. Then fried up one of the eggs from my recent farm delivery over easy on top of the whole thing. I love veggies and eggs for breakfast!

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Smoky Roasted Brussels Sprouts
Recipe type: side dish
 
smoky flavors and roasted Brussels sprouts!
Ingredients
  • 1 lb fresh Brussels sprouts
  • 1-2 teaspoons Smoky Salt Blend
  • 1-2 Tablespoons melted bacon grease
Instructions
  1. Wash and trim the Brussels sprouts and slice them in half.
  2. Place the sprouts in a large bowl, sprinkle with smoky salt, drizzle with bacon grease and toss.
  3. Place in stoneware or cast iron pan and roast at 425 degrees for about 25-30 minutes.

Do you love Brussels sprouts too? You might become a convert once you try this simple recipe! Share with us your favorite way to eat your veggies, leave a reply in the comments section.

This blog is for informational purposes. Some links may be monetized. Thank you for supporting Well Fed Family with your purchases.

 

Turkey Curry Recipe

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As I write this it is the Sunday evening of Thanksgiving weekend. The dishwasher is running, the kitchen is cleaned up, I’ve already made bone broth from the turkey carcass and put five quarts of it in the deep freeze. I’m thankful for my parents who volunteered to make the drive from Alabama to Orlando on a holiday weekend – if you’ve ever tried to drive Florida’s turnpike this time of year you know what a big deal that is! But it was nice to have all the grandparents around the table this year (my husband’s dad, who lives in the area, was also with us) so my kids were very blessed.

Now that the big meal is over we still have an entire gallon ziploc bag of turkey leftover even after two meals of leftovers plus a couple of turkey salad sandwiches for the travelers. My daughter pleaded “no more soup!” (we’ve eaten a lot of soup lately trying to keep everyone from catching the latest virus making the rounds). So I pulled out my recipe for turkey curry – it uses up a pound of the leftovers plus it’s a way to sneak more bone broth into everyone without actually eating more soup. Plus, the flavors of curry are a nice detour away from the typical holiday flavors. By the way, this goes great with leftover cranberry sauce, too!  If you’re reading this and it’s not after a major turkey-filled holiday you could substitute leftover cooked chicken for the turkey.

Turkey Curry

Ingredients

3-4 Tablespoons butter, ghee or coconut oil

1 large apple (peeled or unpeeled, it’s your call), diced

1 large onion, diced

2 garlic cloves, pressed

1 Tablespoon curry powder *

3/4 teaspoon sea salt

1/4 teaspoon ground red pepper (or less if you don’t like spicy)

1/2 cup full fat coconut milk

1 Tablespoon arrowroot powder OR tapioca starch OR non-GMO cornstarch

2 cups homemade turkey stock (or use chicken stock), divided use

4-6 cups chopped leftover turkey (or chicken)

1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice (optional)

3 cups hot cooked basmati rice

Toppings and garnishes:

choose your favorites to sprinkle over the top of the curry-

raisins, diced tomatoes, diced bell pepper, chopped cucumber, parsley, cilantro, pineapple, shredded coconut, chopped nuts, papaya, mango, chutney or even leftover cranberry sauce

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Preparation

Melt the butter or oil in a large skillet or Dutch oven over medium heat. Add the apple and onion to the pan and saute about 10 minutes until the onions are translucent, don’t brown them. Add the garlic and saute another minute. Then add the curry powder, salt and red pepper and stir well. Stir in the coconut milk and 1 1/2 cups of the broth, reduce the heat and simmer another five minutes. Add the chopped turkey. Combine the arrowroot (or other thickener) with the remaining 1/2 cup of stock. Pour the mixture into the pan along with the lemon juice if desired, and stir constantly until the curry begins to thicken slightly. Taste for seasonings and adjust as needed. Serve over the hot cooked rice and top with your favorite condiments.

*curry powders vary wildly in their flavor and spiciness. Most curry powders contain turmeric, coriander, fenugreek and cumin; but they can also contain many other spices including ginger, cayenne pepper, fennel and even saffron. It’s fun to experiment with different curry powders, but read the ingredient list and don’t buy any that include MSG. Good curry powders are salt-free so you can adjust the salt in the recipe to your own taste.

Turkey Curry
Author: 
Recipe type: curry
 
A nice change of pace to use up Thanksgiving leftovers.
Ingredients
  • 3-4 Tablespoons butter, ghee or coconut oil (or a mixture)
  • 1 large apple, diced
  • 1 large onion, diced
  • 2 garlic cloves, pressed
  • 1 Tablespoon curry powder
  • ¾ teaspoon sea salt
  • ¼ teaspoon ground red pepper (or less if you don't like spicy)
  • ½ cup full fat coconut milk
  • 1 Tablespoon arrowroot powder OR tapioca starch OR non-GMO cornstarch
  • 2 cups homemade turkey broth (or chicken broth), divided
  • 4-6 cups chopped cooked turkey (or chicken)
  • 1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice, optional
  • 3 cups hot cooked basmati rice
  • A selection of condiments for topping the curry, choose from:
  • raisins, diced tomato, diced bell pepper, shredded coconut, chopped nuts, mango, papaya, pineapple, chutney or even cranberry sauce
Instructions
  1. Melt the butter in a large skillet or Dutch oven over medium heat.
  2. Add the apple and onion and saute for about 10 minutes until the onion is tender, but not browned.
  3. Add the garlic and cook another minute.
  4. Add the curry powder, salt and red pepper and stir well.
  5. Add the coconut milk and 1½ cups of the broth. Reduce the heat and simmer for about ive minutes, stirring occasionally.
  6. Add the turkey to the pan and stir.
  7. Combine the remaining ½ cup of broth with the arrowroot powder and then pour this mixture into the pan, stirring constantly, until the mixture thickens slightly.
  8. Stir in the lemon juice if desired.
  9. Serve over the hot cooked rice and top with your choice of condiments.
  10. Leftovers are even tastier the next day.

What is your favorite way to use up holiday leftovers? Tell us about it in the comments section or come over to Facebook and start a conversation there.

This blog is for informational purposes. Some links may be monetized. Thank you for supporting Well Fed Family’s blog with your purchases.

Cranberry Orange Coconut Flour Muffins

cranberry orange coconut flour muffin resized titlesEver since the kids were little and we were doing Five In A Row as part of our homeschooling, I’ve had a craving for cranberry bread every time Thanksgiving rolls around. One of our favorite books from FIAR was Cranberry Thanksgiving by Wende and Harry Devlin. “At the edge of a lonely cranberry bog in New England and the winds were cold at the edge of the sea” lived Grandmother and Maggie. Every Thanksgiving they would each invite someone to share dinnerCranberry Thanksgiving book cover with them. This time around, however, Grandmother does not approve of Mr. Whiskers, Maggie’s guest. He behaves suspiciously and when the secret family recipe for cranberry bread just happens to disappear he is the first one Grandmother suspects.

I love the message of the story, that we cannot judge someone by outward appearances, but rather it is what is on the inside that makes someone a precious friend. I also love that at the end of the book they actually share Grandmother’s recipe for cranberry bread!

So here I sat, gray skies threatening rain and me in want of cranberry bread with a hint of orange and sweetness giving fragrance to the gloomy day.  But having put myself on a gluten-free diet I couldn’t make the traditional recipe from the book. Thanks to the Radiant Life free e-book on cooking with coconut flour I was confident and inspired enough to translate the tangy sweet flavors of Grandmother’s recipe into the perfect little gluten-free cranberry muffin. Even my husband, who is not a fan of coconut flour and frequently sighs longingly after the good ol’ days of gluten, said these were great and he could definitely have them again soon!

Cranberry Orange  Coconut Flour Muffins

6 eggs

1/4 cup melted butter or coconut oil

3 Tablespoons of buttermilk

1/3 cup maple syrup

1 teaspoon vanilla

1/2 cup coconut flour

1 teaspoon baking powder

1 teaspoon baking soda

1/2 teaspoon sea salt

1 1/2 teaspoons orange zest (use organic oranges for this)

1 cup fresh cranberries

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Butter a 12 cup muffin tin.

In a food processor, blend the eggs, butter, buttermilk, maple syrup, and vanilla until well mixed. Add the orange zest, baking powder, baking soda, salt and coconut flour. Blend until there are no lumps. Add the cranberries and pulse just until they are chopped.

Scoop the batter into the prepared muffin tin – use about 1/4 cup per each. Bake at 350 for 20 minutes or until the tops are just golden and they begin to pull away from the sides of the pan. Allow the muffins to cool in the pan for about 3 minutes before you remove them to a cooling rack. Serve warm with plenty of butter and a little raw honey if desired.

Cranberry Orange Coconut Flour Muffins
Author: 
Recipe type: quick bread
Serves: 12
 
Inspired by Grandmother's secret cranberry bread recipe in the book Cranberry Thanksgiving
Ingredients
  • 6 eggs
  • ¼ cup melted coconut oil or butter
  • 3 Tablespoons buttermilk
  • ⅓ cup maple syrup
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • ½ cup coconut flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon sea salt
  • 1½ teaspoons fresh orange zest
  • 1 cup fresh cranberries, washed
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and butter a 12 cup muffin tin.
  2. In a food processor, blend eggs, coconut oil, buttermilk, maple syrup, and vanilla until well mixed.
  3. Add orange zest, baking powder, baking soda, salt and coconut flour and blend until there are no lumps.
  4. Add the cranberries and pulse until they are just chopped.
  5. Scoop the batter into the prepared muffin tin using about ¼ cup per each.
  6. Bake at 350 for about 20 minutes until just golden on top and firm to the touch.
  7. Cool in the pan about 5 minutes.
  8. Remove gently to a cooling rack.

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What are your favorite foods this time of year? What one thing do you crave at Thanksgiving? Share with us by leaving a comment, or replying on Facebook.

This blog is for informational purposes only. Some links may be monetized.

 

Pear and Pumpkin Crisp

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Autumn brings inspiration to so many of us. The crisp air, cooler temperatures, and colorful leaves have awakened the imaginations of writers and poets for centuries.

And then there are those of us who appreciate the four seasons like Trader Joe’s: “Winter, Spring, Summer, and… Pumpkin”.

I’ve always loved the Mother Goose rhyme, “Nose, nose, jolly red nose and who gave thee that jolly red nose? Cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg and cloves and that gave me my jolly red nose!”

I adore the spicy allure of the autumn season. A craving for the fall flavors of pear, pumpkin, and spices inspired this recipe. Cobblers, crisps, and pies have always been a favorite but I needed to find a gluten-free alternative. While at a local food summit, I tried an oatmeal topped cobbler that gave me the answer I needed for my dessert dilemma….. Read More Here

Chicago Style Deep Dish Pizza

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My daughter just turned 14, and she requested I make Chicago Style deep dish pizza for her birthday.  I’ve spent a lot of time perfecting pizza recipes. Our family favorite is this one I developed after our first trip to Naples. I’ve also done a breakfast pizza.  More recently I posted a Grilled Pizza recipe in a guest post for Traditional Cooking School. But those were hand-tossed crusts that needed to be crisp/chewy. The deep dish crust is a different texture – a little biscuity, and definitely thicker. I also wanted wanted to incorporate a little sourdough to up the nutritional content as well as the flavor of the crust. Usually deep dish pizzas are all about the fillings and the crust always seems a bit lacking.

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What I came up with was a pizza with a slightly tangy, toothy crust piled high with plenty of toppings smothered in a chunky tomato sauce. I’ve given you a recipe for sausage with peppers and onions or mushrooms, but you can use your own favorites. Just remember to saute any vegetables first or they may release too much liquid while baking and make things soggy.

Crust:

2/3 cup sprouted cornmeal or organic cornmeal

3 cups spelt flour or organic whole wheat flour

2 Tablespoons sourdough starter

2 teaspoons honey or sucanat

2 teaspoons sea salt

1 to 1 1/3 cups water

1/4 cup olive oil

Toppings:

1 lb shredded mozzarella cheese

8 oz shredded provolone cheese

1/4 cup freshly grated parmesan cheese

1 lb. Italian sausage

4 oz fresh mushrooms

1/2 cup thinly sliced onion

1/2 cup thinly sliced green pepper

2 8oz cans organic tomato sauce

1 cup organic diced tomatoes

1 tsp Italian seasoning

1 tsp raw honey

1/2 tsp garlic powder

a pinch of sea salt

olive oil

For the Crust:

Combine the cornmeal, flour, sourdough starter, 2 tsp honey and about a cup of the water in a large mixing bowl. Allow this to rest (also called the autolyze stage) for about 30 minutes. Then add in the oil, salt and any more water needed to make a smooth but still stiff dough. Using the dough hook or your hands, knead the dough for 5 minutes. Cover and allow the dough to sit at room temperature for 8 hours or as long as 24 hours. The longer you let it sit the more nutritious your crust will be, however it will also develop a more sour flavor – so it is a balance between the two.

For the Toppings:

Combine the tomato sauce, diced tomatoes, Italian seasoning, 1 tsp honey, garlic powder and salt in a bowl and set aside. Saute the sausage, mushrooms, onions and peppers in a large skillet until the sausage is done and the vegetables are tender. Combine the shredded mozzarella, and shredded provolone in a bowl.

To Assemble the Pizzas:

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Generously coat the bottom and sides of two deep dish pizza pans with olive oil. I use a stoneware pan like this, but you could also use a 10″ or 11″ cast iron skillet like this if you don’t have a deep dish pan. Divide the dough in half and gently press the dough across the bottom and at least halfway up the sides of the pans. You don’t want it too thick on the bottom or it will be soggy and not cooked all the way through, but you do want it high enough on the sides that it will contain the deep layers of toppings.

Sprinkle 1 cup of the mozzarella mixture across the bottom of each crust. Divide the sausage mixture evenly between the two pizzas and spread over the cheese. Divide the remaining mozzarella mixture between the two pizzas, and then divide the tomato sauce mixture spreading it evenly over the toppings. Sprinkle the shredded Parmesan over the top of each pizza.

Bake the pizzas for 30-35 minutes at 425 degrees or until the crust is a deep golden brown and the filling is bubbling. Remove the pizzas from the oven and let them rest, in the pan, on a cooling rack for ten minutes. These pizzas are superhot and if you eat them right out of the oven you will do some damage to your mouth! The resting time also lets the filling firm up enough that when you slice it everything doesn’t just run all over the pan.

Chicago Stye Deep Dish Pizza
Author: 
Recipe type: deep dish pizza
Cuisine: Italian-American
 
Ingredients
  • Crust:
  • ⅔ cup sprouted cornmeal or organic cornmeal
  • 3 cups spelt flour or organic whole wheat flour
  • 2 Tablespoons sourdough starter
  • 2 teaspoons honey or sucanat
  • 2 teaspoons sea salt
  • 1 to 1⅓ cups water
  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • Toppings:
  • 1 lb. shredded mozzarella cheese
  • 8 oz shredded provolone cheese
  • ¼ cup freshly grated parmesan cheese
  • 1 lb. Italian sausage
  • 4 oz. fresh mushrooms, sliced
  • ½ cup thinly sliced onion
  • ½ cup thinly sliced green pepper
  • 2 8oz cans organic tomato sauce
  • 1 cup organic diced tomatoes
  • 1 teaspoon Italian seasoning
  • 1 teaspoon raw honey
  • ½ teaspoon garlic powder
  • a pinch of sea salt
  • olive oil for the pan
Instructions
  1. For the Crust:
  2. Combine the cornmeal, flour, sourdough starter, 2 teaspoons honey and the water in a large mixing bowl.
  3. Allow this to rest for 30 minutes.
  4. Add in the oil, salt and any more water necessary to make a smooth but still stiff dough.
  5. Using the dough hook or your hands, knead the dough for 5 minutes.
  6. Cover and allow the dough to sit out at room temperature for 8 hours or as long as 24 hours.
  7. The longer it sits the more nutritious it will be, but also the more sour the flavor - find a balance that works for your family.
  8. For the toppings:
  9. Combine the tomato sauce, diced tomatoes, Italian seasoning, 1 teaspoon honey, garlic powder and salt in a bowl and set aside.
  10. Saute the sausage, mushrooms, peppers and onions in a large skillet until the sausage it done and the vegetables are tender.
  11. Combine the shredded mozzarella and shredded provolone in a bowl.
  12. To Assemble the Pizzas:
  13. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.
  14. Generously coat the bottom and sides of two deep dish pizza pans with olive oil.
  15. Divide the dough in half and gently press the dough across the bottom and up the sides of the pans.
  16. Keep the bottom crust evenly thin so it will cook completely.
  17. Sprinkle 1 cup of the mozzarella mixture across the bottom of each crust.
  18. Divide the sausage mixture evenly between the two pizzas.
  19. Divide the remaining mozzarella mixture evenly on top of the sausage layer.
  20. Divide the tomato sauce mixture spreading evenly across the top of each pizza.
  21. Sprinkle the tops with shredded parmesan.
  22. Bake the pizzas for 30-35 minutes or until the crust is a deep golden brown and the filling is bubbling.
  23. Remove the pizzas from the oven and let them rest in the pan for 10 minutes - do not skip this step!
  24. Slice the pizzas and enjoy.

IMG_4273 web large watermarkWhen you’ve had enough turkey leftovers and feel like calling out for pizza, try this deep dish pizza instead. Have you ever made deep dish pizza before? Leave a reply and tell us your favorite toppings. Use the media buttons at the top to Pin this for later or Tweet to friends.

This blog is for informational purposes only. Some links may be monetized.

 

 

 

 

Foods For Immunity

Guest blog post for Raisin’ Acres Farm. Amy shares her journey to finding healing foods for her family.

A little more than ten years ago my family began making major dietary changes that have resulted in much better health for all of us. Up to that time my children were prescribed antibiotics several times every year for ear infections and upper respiratory infections, I had my share of bad colds that seemed to last forever, and one of my children had chronic constipation that disrupted our family life for three years. Today, more than a decade and two children later, we are free from medications and sicknesses are no longer the rule. My youngest, born about 7 years after our diet changes, has never had medication of any kind, nor has she ever been to the doctor for a sick visit.  read more….

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