DIY Laundry Soap

For the second time in my life I’ve made the switch to homemade laundry soap.  The first time it didn’t work out very well because the recipe was complicated, involved dedicated pots and pans, and ended up making my towels repel water instead of absorb it.  I went back to using regular store detergent before I’d even finished the first bottle of that old recipe.  But the reasons for using a homemade laundry soap still existed.

  • the dyes and fragrances are toxic to people and environment
  • the detergents are often toxic to the local water supply
  • store bought is expensive and you have all those containers to throw away or recycle
  • even the dye-free/fragrance-free brands still irritate our skin

Then while listening to one of the online summits last year I became convinced that I needed to try again. I’ve been taking baby steps to reduce the chemicals in our house from cleaning products. So I gave it another try. I like this new recipe better. It’s based on one from DIY Natural and is a powdered product rather than liquid so the whole thing is quick and easy to make. I can customize the fragrance using my own essential oils, and clean up is a snap. It works well for all our laundry situations from towels to delicates to dirty baseball uniforms.

Since the homemade soap is very, very low sudsing it is safe to use in H.E. washing machines. The kind of bar soap you choose is important. I choose a coconut castile soap because it is an efficient cleanser, but not irritating to skin. Other kinds of castile soaps would also work, as would a pure soap such as Ivory or a laundry soap such as Fels Naptha.

Last month when I was out of town for FPEA Homeschool Day at the Capitol with the kids, my husband decided to do laundry. I had just run out of the DIY soap so he went to Publix and bought the smallest bottle of their store brand he could find and washed some of his shirts. Just that one time of using commercial detergent and he was ready for me to switch back to the homemade brand – his shirts all made him itchy and uncomfortable! So I know I’m making a difference with the homemade. Here’s the easy recipe:

DIY Laundry Soap
Recipe type: laundry soap
 
Make your own dye-free, fragrance-free laundry soap. Save money and reduce the chemicals in your house.
Ingredients
  • 1 cup of washing soda
  • 1 cup of borax
  • 1 bar of natural soap such as a castile soap
  • 10-20 drops of essential oil of your choice
Instructions
  1. Using a box grater, grate the bar of castile soap into a large bowl.
  2. Combine the grated soap, borax, washing soda and essential oils.
  3. Mix thoroughly for several minutes to be sure it is well combined.
  4. Use 2 level tablespoons of soap mixture for each large load of laundry.

 

laundry soap 1 laundry soap 2 laundry soap 3

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Sacred Fat

This blog post is a product of a lot of studying and thinking for a long period of time. Amy and I have talked extensively about it, she’s texted, emailed and phoned me back with random thoughts, Bible verses and other ideas as they’ve occurred. I’d like to write something more detailed eventually, but I think it’s important to write something now.

caravaggio sacrifice of Isaac

Caravaggio Sacrifice of Isaac

Ok, it started with the word Sacrifice.  Defined as the act of offering to God something precious; or the item itself that is being offered; it is also the surrender of something for the sake of something else – something given up or lost.  So something is only a sacrifice when it is meaningful, when there is hardship involved, and when we do it for a greater purpose.  It is important to get that definition of sacrifice in your head, let it sink in.  It’s not really a sacrifice unless what is being given up is something precious.

It is this misunderstanding of sacrifice that I did not fully comprehend and therefore I was able to have this disconnected view of scripture vs. what I personally was doing and what I believed.  Growing up in the 70s and 80s I remember the legendary Time Magazine cover with the eggs-and-bacon frowning face, I memorized the food pyramid with the “fats and oils sparingly” near the top. I bought things because they were fat-free, I tried to drink skim milk (and decided that no milk was better than skim milk – gag!).

Not fully getting the depth of what a sacrifice actually is made it so hard for me when I would read from Exodus or Leviticus about all of the sacrifices required from the Israelites.  Like this one from Exodus 29 “take from this ram the fat, the fat tail, the fat on the internal organs, the long lobe of the liver, both kidneys with the fat on them, and the right thigh…it is the ram for the ordination…burn it up…it must not be eaten, it is sacred.”  Or this one from Leviticus 3 “from the fellowship offering you are to bring a food offering to the Lord: its fat, the entire fat tail cut off close to the backbone, the internal organs and all the fat that is connected to them, both kidneys with the fat on them near the loins, and the long lobe of the liver, which you will remove with the kidneys.”

I mean really, why is there such detail? And why specifically those parts? I remember reading those passages years ago and thinking God wanted all the gross stuff and he left all the normal bits for the Israelites, He’s such a benevolent Lord letting them keep the steaks and the chops while he took the fat and the liver.  But if that were true, it wouldn’t be much of a sacrifice now would it?

butter and slice It took me a long time to get it, and it wasn’t until I read about Dr. Price’s villagers in his book Nutrition and Physical Degeneration, and about how many of those cultures had sacred foods, that these thoughts began to take shape.  I read about the Swiss villagers in the Loetschental Valley who filled a bowl with the deep orange-yellow butter made from the cream of the cows eating the fresh, green grass of spring. They would place a candle wick in this bowl of vitamin-rich butter, light the wick and place it in a sanctuary specially built just to honor God for giving them this precious food that gave life and health to their village. Native American Indians in northern British Columbia would hunt moose, and after killing one the very first thing they would do would be to open it up, and in the back of the moose just above the kidney would be two balls surrounded by fat. They would remove these and cut them up into as many pieces as there were people in their family and each person, child and adult, would eat his piece. These two fatty bits were the adrenal glands of the moose which we now know are the richest source of vitamin C in all animal or plant tissues.  Natives living on islands near the Great Barrier Reef would purposefully attract sharks and then dive in after them armed with pointed sticks, to slip coconut fiber ropes over the sharks’ heads and pull them to shore because sharks livers were a vital part of the foods they needed to stay healthy.

Learning about all of these people all around the world who put forth so much effort just to have certain foods I began to understand something. All of these highly-valued foods were similar to the very items called for in the sacrifices of the Israelites that I was having such a hard time understanding.

Unger’s Bible Dictionary tells of a breed of sheep raised during Bible times in the Middle East bred to have a particularly luscious and fatty tail. This tail and its rich fat were forbidden to be eaten if the animal was part of a sacrifice offered to God. Also forbidden to be eaten was the fat from around the stomach, entrails and kidneys – all of the richest parts from which we would use nowadays to make high quality tallow. Unger’s goes on to explain that the fat was the richest part of the animal and stood for healthfulness and vigor.

In my past readings of scriptures about sacrificial laws I was approaching it with a modern worldview brainwashed by the government agencies dictating diet advice that condemned fat as bad, said organ meats were dangerous, and told us to eat lean meats instead.  I should have trusted God instead of buying those lies. Isaiah 55 says “Listen, listen to me and eat what is good, and you will delight in the richest of fare….For my thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are your ways my ways declares the Lord. As the heavens are higher than the earth, so are my ways higher than your ways and my thoughts than your thoughts.”

Because of Dr. Price’s writings, and because of the work of Sally Fallon Morell in Nourishing Traditions, I understand that organ meats are superfoods full of vitamins crucial to health; I know that the fats from grazing free-range animals are rich in vitamins that work as activators for the minerals and other nutrients we eat. I’ve learned these fat-soluble activators are essential to maintaining fertility, growth and health in all humans. And now I understand that God was truly asking for a sacrifice, something that would have been a real hardship to nomadic people whose very life depended on the animals they herded. God commanded them to give to Him the most valuable parts of the very best animals they owned.  The Bible, especially the Old Testament, is filled with expressions using fat to represent something wonderful – “the fat of the earth”, “the fat of the wheat, of the oil, and the wine,” even “the fat of the mighty”.

burnt-offering Not only were the Israelites called to sacrifice these choicest of parts, but then they would burn the fat on the altar with fire.  Just imagine the aromas that would release – the Bible calls it a “sweet savor unto the Lord”, but anyone who has smelled grilling hamburgers, steaks, or even better, pit barbecue, can attest to the mouthwatering scents that fill the air around those events.  The sacrifices of precious fat and organ meats given over to God on the fire of the altar were the way man could show his complete surrender to God, to show his heart was pure and ready to be obedient. And when a different animal was slaughtered destined to become food rather than sacrificed, the fat, organ meats and choicest bits would be even more appreciated knowing that they were good enough to be given to the Lord.

There’s so much more to say, more directions to go with these thoughts – how did we end up on the road to thinking fat was bad? Why did we think we could improve on fat by making trans fats, fake fats and industrial fats? When we are poor stewards of God’s creatures feeding them foods they were not created to eat, making them live in ways they were not meant to live why are we shocked to learn their fat (and meat) no longer provides what we need?  But I need to stop now. I’m very interested to hear your thoughts, to find out if this has sparked an “aha!” moment for you, too, like it did for me. Please leave a comment by clicking on the “leave a reply” link next to this article!

I’m linking this up with the Easter Sunday Social.

Sunday Social Blog Hop

Sunday Social Blog Hop

Some links may be monetized. This blog is for informational purposes only. 

 

Sunday Social Blog Hop for Easter Sunday April 20, 2014

sunday social 3

Welcome!

What Is The Sunday Social Blog Hop?

A virtual “Sunday Social”, where we all gather together and share good food recipes and be an encouragement to one another with articles of spiritual and inspirational nature. Come join us, submit YOUR articles, browse around and visit a site or two and learn some new recipes and be encouraged!

This Blog Hop is being hosted by:

Simply Natural Network

Kat @ Simply Living Simply

Marci @ Amazing Graze Farm

Lee @ Well Fed Family

Sara @ The Granola Mommy

Tessa @ Homestead Lady

Pam @ Thankful Expressions

Priscilla @ salam mama

Angela @ Grassfed Mama

What Can I Post?

All of your wonderful tried-and-true family favorite food recipes AND Inspirational/Spiritual/Religious encouragement type posts!

*Make sure and include either a text link or the blog hop button below (copy/save) in your linked post.

We would be pleased as punch if you wanted to put this button in your sidebar:

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How Can I Be A Featured Blogger?

By linking up! Our featured blogger is chosen each week at random by our Co-hosts…and we hope to have YOU as our next featured blogger!

If you are selected as “Featured”, make sure and grab your button (just copy/paste):

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**Please note: By linking to this Blog Hop you are giving us permission to link back to your post if you are featured. We will also include 1 photo from your post in the interest of sending visitors your way. So you don’t miss a single Blog Hop, we will also add you to our e-mail reminder list. For a little extra exposure/marketing BONUS, we will also “PIN” your submissions on our PINTEREST Board-HOP on over and check that out….HERE! Just a quick reminder: All posts are welcome, however let’s keep them uplifting, encouraging, respectful and kind…otherwise they may be removed**

Congratulations to our Featured Bloggers:

Inspirational/Spiritual:

Faithful Feat

What

I’m a WHAT? help meet

Recipes:

Taylor Made Ranch

Thousand-Island-Dressing-TaylorMadeRanch

MYO Thousand Island Dressing In Minutes

Let the blogging begin…

brownscrollybar


Roast Leg of Lamb

carving lamb

tender slices of medium-rare roast lamb

Lamb has a long, rich, worldwide culinary history. Enjoyed in ancient China, Greece, Italy, Iraq and Romania, sheep were one of the earliest of the domesticated animals. Even today the Romans claim they have the best pastureland in all of Italy and therefore the best tasting lamb. The roast leg of lamb is traditionally found on the Sunday family dinner tables in France, but it makes a wonderful main course for any holiday or family gathering.  Not only is roast lamb delicious, it is thankfully also easy to prepare.  Roast leg of lamb will grace our family table this Easter, and I hope you can enjoy it at your house too.

A whole leg of lamb usually weighs anywhere from 4 to 8 lbs. Choose the size that best fits the number of people you will serve, and be sure to get enough for leftovers. Roast lamb stew, sandwiches, and stir fry are all delicious.

For the richest flavor schedule your lamb preparations for the day before you plan to serve so the meat can absorb the flavors of the herbs and seasonings.  In the recipe below I give you two options for the herb blend. The oregano and lemon blend will give you more of a Greek-style flavor, while the rosemary blend is more Tuscan/French. I give measurements for a 5-6 lb. leg of lamb. If yours is larger then just scale up the seasonings a bit so you’ll have enough to cover the whole thing. Roasting the meat at high heat and then reducing it to finish at a lower temperature will give you tender, juicy meat even with grassfed, pasture-raised lamb.

Roast Leg of Lamb
Author: 
Recipe type: Main Course
 
Fragrant roast lamb makes a festive main dish for any family occasion.
Ingredients
  • 1 leg of lamb with the bone, about 5-6 lbs.
  • 4 cloves of garlic, crushed
  • 3 Tblsp fresh rosemary needles pulled from the stem
  • 1 tsp each of Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • OR for Greek-style flavors replace the rosemary with 3 Tblsp fresh oregano leaves plus the zest and juice of half a lemon
Instructions
  1. For best flavor season the lamb the day before, or at least several hours before, you plan to serve.
  2. Place the garlic, rosemary, olive oil, salt and pepper in a small food processor and process into a finely minced puree.
  3. If you don’t have a food processor you can mince the rosemary as finely as possible and then use the back of a large spoon to crush and mix the rosemary, garlic, oil, salt and pepper in a bowl until well combined.
  4. Use the tip of a sharp knife to make a dozen or more 1″ deep slits all over the surface of the meat.
  5. Insert ½ tsp of the herb mixture into each of the slits, pushing it down into the meat until you’ve used it all up.
  6. Wrap the lamb tightly and refrigerate for up to one day.
  7. To roast, remove the lamb from the refrigerator an hour before roasting time to allow it to come to room temperature.
  8. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.
  9. Remove the wrap and place the lamb in a roasting pan with the fat side facing up.
  10. Place the lamb in the preheated oven and roast for 30 minutes.
  11. Reduce the oven temperature to 300 degrees.
  12. Continue to cook the lamb for another 50 minutes, basting with the accumulated juices from the bottom of the pan.
  13. Use a meat thermometer to check for doneness.
  14. Medium rare is an internal temperature of 145 degrees, medium is 160 and well done is 170.
  15. When the meat is done to your liking, remove the lamb from the oven and tent with aluminum foil allowing it to rest about 15 minutes to absorb the juices and be ready for slicing.
  16. If your lamb is over 5lbs plan on an extra 30 minutes of cooking time per pound.

 

lamb before

leg of lamb with rosemary garlic herb rub

 

leg of lamb

golden roasted leg of lamb

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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This blog has been liked to Allergy-Free Wednesdays at Whole New Mom and Wellness Wednesdays at Richly Rooted.

 

 

 

Fresh Green Beans Mediterranean-style

Fresh green beans are overflowing the farmer’s market tables and produce bins.  These aren’t the thick, heavy pole beans in need of lengthy simmering, but rather the long, thin, bright green snap beans perfect for quickly steaming served glistening with deep yellow spring butter.  Or pair them with the first early tomatoes and make this party-worthy side dish.

This recipe is a family favorite and makes about 5 servings, but you can easily double it to serve a crowd for Easter dinner. The flavors go well with a beautiful roast leg of lamb or golden turkey.

Fresh Green Beans Mediterranean-style
Author: 
Recipe type: side dish vegetable
Cuisine: Mediterranean
 
fresh green beans are dressed up with sun-drenched flavors of tomato and garlic
Ingredients
  • 1 lb. fresh green beans, cleaned and snapped in half
  • 1 Tblsp real butter
  • 2 cloves fresh garlic, crushed
  • 1 can organic diced tomatoes OR 1 lb fresh tomatoes, peeled and diced
  • 1 Tblsp chopped fresh oregano OR 1 tsp dried
  • ¼ tsp sea salt
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • extra virgin olive oil
Instructions
  1. Fill a large pot half full with filtered water, about 2 quarts, and bring to a boil over high heat.
  2. Add the green beans and cook for 4 minutes until bright green and crisp-tender.
  3. Drain the beans and set aside.
  4. Add the butter to the pot and melt over medium heat.
  5. Add garlic, tomatoes, oregano, salt and pepper stirring well until somewhat thickened, about one minute.
  6. Add the green beans to the tomato mixture and stir well.
  7. Taste and adjust seasoning if needed.
  8. Serve hot or at room temperature drizzled with a good extra virgin olive oil to garnish.

green snap beans

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Sunday Social Blog Hop for April 13, 2014

sunday social 3

Welcome!

What Is The Sunday Social Blog Hop?

A virtual “Sunday Social”, where we all gather together and share good food recipes and be an encouragement to one another with articles of spiritual and inspirational nature. Come join us, submit YOUR articles, browse around and visit a site or two and learn some new recipes and be encouraged!

This Blog Hop is being hosted by:

Simply Natural Network

Kat @ Simply Living Simply

Marci @ Amazing Graze Farm

Lee @ Well Fed Family

Sara @ The Granola Mommy

Tessa @ Homestead Lady

Pam @ Thankful Expressions

Priscilla @ salam mama

Angela @ Grassfed Mama

What Can I Post?

All of your wonderful tried-and-true family favorite food recipes AND Inspirational/Spiritual/Religious encouragement type posts!

*Make sure and include either a text link or the blog hop button below (copy/save) in your linked post.

We would be pleased as punch if you wanted to put this button in your sidebar:

sunday social 200

How Can I Be A Featured Blogger?

By linking up! Our featured blogger is chosen each week at random by our Co-hosts…and we hope to have YOU as our next featured blogger!

If you are selected as “Featured”, make sure and grab your button (just copy/paste):

sunday social feat 200

**Please note: By linking to this Blog Hop you are giving us permission to link back to your post if you are featured. We will also include 1 photo from your post in the interest of sending visitors your way. So you don’t miss a single Blog Hop, we will also add you to our e-mail reminder list. For a little extra exposure/marketing BONUS, we will also “PIN” your submissions on our PINTEREST Board-HOP on over and check that out….HERE! Just a quick reminder: All posts are welcome, however let’s keep them uplifting, encouraging, respectful and kind…otherwise they may be removed**

Let the blogging begin…

 


Synergy and Our Body’s Balancing Act

Synergy happens when many parts come together to make a whole that is even greater than the simple sum of the individual elements.  In the Bible book of 1 Corinthians 12 the apostle Paul talks about a kind of synergy in the body of Christ’s believers. Paul uses the human body as his example when he says “the body is not made up of one part but many.”  One part is not more important than another, and all parts no matter how seemingly insignificant are necessary to the body. Paul wrote “The eye cannot say to the hand, ‘I don’t need you!’ And the head cannot say to the feet, ‘I don’t need you!’ 22 On the contrary, those parts of the body that seem to be weaker are indispensable,”  Just like the parts of the body work synergistically to make a living, breathing person so do the various nutrients work within our bodies.

Wander down any grocery aisle and you’d likely think that some nutrients were more important than others. “Calcium Fortified!” is plastered across everything from orange juice to chocolate calcium fortified Orange Juice syrup.  Skim milk, breakfast cereals and margarine carry boldface letters announcing  “Added vitamin D!” The truth is that no single nutrient is more important than another. Just like our feet must cooperate with our toes, our legs and our brains in order for us to walk or run, so must the nutrients we get from our diet work together to keep us strong and healthy.

Vitamin A is crucial for eyesight and a healthy immune system, but taking too much vitamin A on its own over time can be toxic. Vitamin D is critical to life,  guiding the body to make strong bones and a calm, healthy nervous system.  Taking megadoses of Vitamin D over time can also be toxic. But together, when vitamins A&D are present and balanced within the structure of a healthy, nutrient-dense diet, they work synergistically to protect against toxicity.  Look at calcium: Taken on its own in large doses calcium can actually cause osteoporosis and atherosclerosis. This is called the “calcium paradox”. Balance the calcium with magnesium, along with Vitamins D&K2, and you stop the toxicity.

Chris Masterjohn PhD, a researcher with the Weston A Price Foundation, says that we need to take the focus away from trying to achieve a particular concentration of any single vitamin in our bodies and instead realize that ALL of the fat soluble vitamins are important. Eating a good diet, such as the one recommended by Dr. Weston Price, insures that you have balanced levels of all the nutrients allowing for synergistic action between the nutrients.

Dr. Kate Rheaume-Bleue explained this nutrient synergy like a team of gymnasts working together to put on fancy balancing acts, but if one team member lets go the whole pyramid collapses on the ground.  Dr. Kate says that the fat soluble vitamins team up with the minerals gymnastic balancing act like calcium and magnesium. Working together the vitamins make sure the minerals go where they are needed instead of ending up in a place where they would do harm. She notes that 50% of all heart attack victims have cholesterol levels considered normal or desired. Instead of using cholesterol levels to predict heart disease Dr. Kate suggests testing for the presence of calcium in the coronary arteries, meaning the synergy with A, D, K2 and calcium has broken down.

You also need to know our bodies can’t store vitamin K2. We have to eat it every day or we won’t have enough of it and it won’t be in balance. Unfortunately most people don’t eat the right kind of food anymore to get K2. Industrial farming and CAFOs deplete K2. Trans fats block K2!  Animals produce K2 only as long as they are eating grass and other green foods rich in K1. Then we can get enough K2 by eating their milk, eggs and organ meats. Fermented foods help us produce K2.  Foods with higher levels of K2 include Natto, cheese, egg yolks, butter, chicken liver, salami, chicken breast and ground beef.

Finally, it’s not just the vitamins that work together; fat is also important.  Fat is what allows the fat-soluble vitamins to be absorbed and used. Vitamin E and fat increase our absorption of vitamin A.  According to Chris Masterjohn, the most effective type of fat in aiding the absorption of vitamins A, D, K2 and especially beta carotene, is saturated fat.  The least effective? Those industrially produced polyunsaturated oils such as canola and soy.

Just like the loving body of believers in Ephesians 4 who are “joined and held together by every supporting ligament, grows and builds itself up in love, as each part does its work.”  So do our own physical bodies work when we honor the foods created to work synergistically within us as each nutrient does its work to build us up.

This was posted as part of the Sunday Social Blog Hop.

Sunday Social Blog Hop

Sunday Social Blog Hop

Some links may be monetized. This blog is for informational purposes only.

 

 

The Nourished Living Summit is now available for purchase – get lifetime access to your favorite sessions!

NLN Full-Summit-Square-New I hope you’ve been enjoying the Nourished Living Summit and will continue to listen through the end of this month, April 29th.  You can have all the great information from the Summit to keep when you purchase the Summit package that includes:

  • Lifetime access to all 62 expert audio presentations (MP3 format);
  • Lifetime access to all 62 slide presentations;
  • Over 300 Pages of Presentation Summaries;
  • Over $150 Worth of Free Bonus Items;
  • 35 Exclusive Special Offers and Discounts;
  • 109 Page Speaker Guide;
  • Automatic Lifetime Access to All Future Presentations Released in 2014-2015 (including accompanying MP3s, slides, and summaries)

To purchase the entire Summit with Lifetime Access for the introductory price of $149 click here for more details.

You can also purchase single sessions of your favorite speakers:

  • Lifetime access to all audio presentations (MP3 format) in that track;
  • Lifetime access to all slide presentations in that track;
  • Presentation Summaries for that track;
  • 35 Exclusive Special Offers and Discounts;
  • Speaker Guide

To purchase individual tracks of your favorite Summit sessions for $49 each click here for more details.

Remember – the Summit is available to listen free with different sessions every two days all the way through the end of April! Take advantage of this great opportunity!

Some links may be monetized. This blog is for informational purposes only.

 

Avocado and Grapefruit Salad with Lime and Fresh Mint

The weather here in Central Florida has been spectacular this week – blue skies, fluffy white clouds, temps in the mid-70s to low 80s, cool breezes in the palm trees – it’s like living in a vacation postcard :)   The mint in my yard is growing like crazy, I picked enough peppermint to dry and use for peppermint tea, and I’m using the English mint in a great salad recipe that I can’t wait to share with you today!  Grapefruit season stretches on at least through the end of this month and it’s getting to that time of year where people are tired of it and are leaving bags of it in the back hall at church or on people’s front porches.  My avocado tree is already blooming, getting ready for next year, but I did find a big bag of five avocadoes for $4 at Sam’s Club.

English mint

English mint

I love all the different tastes and textures in this dish with juicy tart grapefruit, creamy rich avocado, and the mojito magic of the lime and mint all come together to create a salad that makes its own dressing.   I’ve used spring mix, and I’ve used different kinds of head lettuces, but I also think arugula might be good with its peppery bite.  Sturdy Romaine holds up well if you want leftovers.  Peel and supreme the grapefruit right over the bowl you will use for the salad so you catch all the juices.  Never supreme a grapefruit? It’s easy, but you need a sharp knife! Just peel the fruit including the white pith, then use the sharp knife to slice out the individual sections and tossing the membrane (but not before squeezing out any remaining juice into the bowl!)

Avocado and Grapefruit Salad with Lime and Fresh Mint
Author: 
Recipe type: salad
 
Bright flavors and contrasting textures in a salad that makes its own dressing.
Ingredients
  • 2 large pink grapefruit
  • ⅓ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • juice from one lime (and a little zest if desired)
  • ½ tsp sea salt
  • 1 or 2 Hass type avocadoes
  • 1 head of lettuce or bag of spring mix, washed and spun dry
  • big handful of fresh mint leaves
Instructions
  1. Peel and supreme the grapefruit catching the juices in the bowl.
  2. Peel, pit and chop the avocado.
  3. Chop or slice the lettuce into fork-size pieces.
  4. Finely slice the mint leaves.
  5. Combine all the ingredients in a large salad bowl and toss well to coat the lettuce and distribute the ingredients.
fresh farmer's market finds

fresh farmer’s market finds

 

 

 

 

 

This blog is being shared on the Sunday Social Blog Hop.

Sunday Social Blog Hop

Sunday Social Blog Hop

Some links may be monetized. This blog is for informational purposes only.

Sunday Social Blog Hop for April 6, 2014

sunday social 3

Welcome!

What Is The Sunday Social Blog Hop?

A virtual “Sunday Social”, where we all gather together and share good food recipes and be an encouragement to one another with articles of spiritual and inspirational nature. Come join us, submit YOUR articles, browse around and visit a site or two and learn some new recipes and be encouraged!

This Blog Hop is being hosted by:

Simply Natural Network

Kat @ Simply Living Simply

Marci @ Amazing Graze Farm

Lee @ Well Fed Family

Sara @ The Granola Mommy

Tessa @ Homestead Lady

Pam @ Thankful Expressions

Priscilla @ salam mama

Angela @ Grassfed Mama

What Can I Post?

All of your wonderful tried-and-true family favorite food recipes AND Inspirational/Spiritual/Religious encouragement type posts!

*Make sure and include either a text link or the blog hop button below (copy/save) in your linked post.

We would be pleased as punch if you wanted to put this button in your sidebar:

sunday social 200

How Can I Be A Featured Blogger?

By linking up! Our featured blogger is chosen each week at random by our Co-hosts…and we hope to have YOU as our next featured blogger!

If you are selected as “Featured”, make sure and grab your button (just copy/paste):

sunday social feat 200

**Please note: By linking to this Blog Hop you are giving us permission to link back to your post if you are featured. We will also include 1 photo from your post in the interest of sending visitors your way. So you don’t miss a single Blog Hop, we will also add you to our e-mail reminder list. For a little extra exposure/marketing BONUS, we will also “PIN” your submissions on our PINTEREST Board-HOP on over and check that out….HERE! Just a quick reminder: All posts are welcome, however let’s keep them uplifting, encouraging, respectful and kind…otherwise they may be removed**

Congratulations to our Featured Bloggers:

Inspirational/Spiritual:

The Farmhouse Blog

The Farmhouse Blog

The Farmhouse Blog

The Titanic Was Sold Out

Recipes:

Sweet and Spicy Monkey

guacomole

Sweet and Spicy Monkey

Guacamole

Let the blogging begin…