Turkey Broth Instructions and Free Recipe to Share

turkey broth titlesThe big feast is over, the turkey is eaten, but there is still one more thing to do….Make Broth!! Here is a free printable and shareable set of instructions plus an easy recipe for Turkey and Rice soup.

turkey broth and recipe card

What will you make with your broth? Who will you share this recipe with? Tell us about it in the comments!

This blog is for informational purposes only. Some links may be monetized. Thank you for supporting us with your purchases.


5 ways to bless your family titles

5 Ways to Bless Your Family, Your Budget and Your Community

 This blog is for informational purposes. Some links may be monetized. Thank you for supporting Well Fed Family with your purchases. 

5 ways to bless your family titles


Take This Short Quiz

  1. What is the number one thing you can do as a family to improve your general health?
  1. What is a good way to connect with your teenagers?
  1. What is the most important thing the average person can do to make the American food system healthier and more sustainable?
  1. Name one thing can an individual do to become more self-sufficient and less dependent on a fluctuating, unstable economy?
  1. What activity can you do with young children to engage them in learning concepts in math and science even when they don’t usually enjoy those subjects?

The answers:

  1. cook 2. cook 3. cook 4. cook 5. cook

 Cooking vs Watching Cooking

Two people (both grandmothers!) in the last week have told me “I don’t cook!” Way too many people in my classes over the years have admitted they rarely or never cook. In fact Americans spend less time on average cooking each day than people in any other country! The average time spent cooking per day (not per meal, per DAY!) is 27 minutes – less time than it takes to watch The Next Food Network Star (what is up with this fascination of watching people cook? More people watch cooking than are actually doing cooking, and then when the show is over they still don’t have anything to eat!)

 It’s Healthier

Cooking at home is healthier. When you don’t cook you make yourself vulnerable to the big corporations who make all the ready-to-eat food you have to buy. Unless you spend big bucks to buy your meals from a local restaurant where the chef grows his own organic vegetables and carefully sources his ingredients from local farms, you are most likely eating a lot more refined sugar, industrial oils, and highly processed salt than you normally would if you cooked your own food. Corporations also use all kinds of chemical ingredients not available to the home cook. These chemical ingredients make their food last longer and look fresher than it actually is.

 Teens Like It

Cooking (and eating) together connects you as a family. Teens are social creatures, and they are also usually hungry creatures. :) Bringing them into the kitchen to prepare a meal is a way to get them to interact and be social with everyone who is involved in the meal preparation process. The shared experiences can build family bonds. Eating together a meal you have prepared gives a safe place for conversation, listening and sharing together.

 It Connects Us

Cooking connects you with your food and its origins. We were making homemade pizza as part of a Sunday school lesson and I had brought fresh oregano, parsley, and basil from my garden to use. One young 5th grade girl, already surprised that you could actually make a pizza, freaked out saying “why do you have weeds? How do you know those are safe to eat?” I said, “I grew these. They came from my garden. Where do you think food comes from?” and she replied, “I don’t know. The store has it.”

When we cook at home from fresh ingredients we are connecting in a small way to the rest of the community that grows and raises our food. We gain a new perspective on food when we see a list of raw ingredients get transformed into a meal. Growing something that you eat, or buying directly from a farmer, can bring even stronger connections. Real food doesn’t come in neat boxes, shrink wrapped for microwaving. Buying pre-prepared, pre-wrapped meals separates us from the reality of real food. Cooking at home from fresh ingredients creates more demand for real food while reducing the waste and high cost inherent in the processed food system.

 It’s Budget Friendly

Knowing how to cook gives you power over your budget. The illusion of the “value meal” keeps many people trapped eating expensive yet unhealthy food. Being able to cook for yourself means you can eat higher quality ingredients for less money. It means you can cook a little extra to freeze for later or to eat the next day for lunch instead of eating out. Knowing how to cook helps you be more frugal like when you use the bones for broth, leftover vegetables for soup, or freeze over ripe fruit for smoothies.

 It’s Educational

Teaching your children to cook opens up a new world for them. Measuring and counting, doubling a recipe, figuring out what makes bread rise, what makes pickles sour, seeing liquid cream transform into solid butter, comparing the taste of salt vs. sugar – all of this can bring math and science alive. Tactile experiences like kneading bread, cracking eggs, tearing lettuce, stirring batter, or chopping vegetables can be rewarding for busy little hands. And as your children grow and develop new skills in the kitchen you are giving them the gift of self-sufficiency for when they become adults.

Tell us your reasons for cooking! Leave a comment here or on our Facebook page!

6 Natural Strategies to Fight Off Flu Season

Ginger tea with lemon, honey, garlic for a healthy soothing detox drink


Flu season is here again…

And it will last from now through early spring.

An average year sees 5% to 20% of our population affected by the flu virus, depending on the severity of the year’s strain.

Influenza is caused by a highly contagious virus that typically infects us through the mucous membranes of the mouth, nose, or eyes. Exposure to the virus can be airborne from a cough or sneeze — or it can come from touching a contaminated surface, such as a doorknob or telephone, and then touching your nose or mouth.

Symptoms include a sudden onset of fever, aches, chills, and tiredness, and possibly a dry cough, sneezing, and sore throat.

If you find yourself sick with the flu, it’s important to know your enemy — the influenza virus — so you can defeat it.

Since it is a virus, not a bacteria, causing the infection, antibiotics won’t work.

Hygiene can play a major role in prevention since the virus spreads through coughing, sneezing, or touching an infected surface. However, antibacterial soap or gels won’t work!

Here are six strategies you can use at home ….[read more]

5 Kombucha Flavors {For Fall}



It can be expensive to purchase, but it costs just pennies to make at home!

I’m talking about the tart and sweet, naturally effervescent and refreshing, immune-boosting drink we call Kombucha. It’s one of my family’s favorite beverages.

Here are five fun flavors to try this fall. Some are spicy and reminiscent of a delicious dessert, while others are fruity and tart…[read the rest of this post at Traditional Cooking School]

Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Muffins: grain-free with dairy-free option

This blog is for informational purposes only. Some links may be monetized. Thank you for supporting Well Fed Family with your purchases.

pumpkin chocolate chip muffin grain freeIt’s fall and time for all things pumpkin! We are eating far fewer grains right now because some in our family do better without them. But I needed a muffin that would also please the tastebuds of the others who don’t have to restrict grains. These muffins fit that requirement! They aren’t overly sweet, but the addition of chocolate chips gives a little burst of sweetness that goes well with the fall spices. Be sure to keep any leftovers in the refrigerator. For a dairy-free muffin use coconut oil or palm shortening in place of the butter.

Grain-free Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Muffins

1 cup canned pumpkin

3 eggs from pasture-raised hens

1/4 cup melted butter, or coconut oil

3 Tablespoons raw honey

1 1/4 cup almond flour

1/2 cup arrowroot flour

3 Tablespoons coconut flour

1 teaspoon aluminum-free baking soda

1/4 teaspoon sea salt

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon ground ginger

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg

1/8 teaspoon ground cloves

1/3 cup soy-free mini chocolate chips

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Prepare your muffin pan with muffin papers or butter.

Mix together the pumpkin, eggs, melted butter or oil, and the honey in a medium bowl. In a large bowl stir together the almond flour, arrowroot, coconut flour, baking soda, sea salt and the spices. Pour the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients and stir until well blended. Stir in the chocolate chips and divide the batter equally between the muffin cups. Bake for 22-25 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean.

Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Muffins: grain-free with dairy-free option
Recipe type: grain-free muffin
Spicy cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg and clove flavor this grain-free muffin perfect for the whole family. Chocolate chips give a nice twist on the traditional fall treat.
  • 1 cup canned pumpkin
  • 3 eggs from pastured hens
  • ¼ cup melted butter or coconut oil
  • 3 Tablespoons raw honey
  • 1¼ cups almond flour
  • ½ cup arrowroot flour
  • 3 Tablespoons coconut flour
  • 1 teaspoon aluminum-free baking soda
  • ¼ teaspoon sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon ground ginger
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg
  • ⅛ teaspoon ground cloves
  • ⅓ cup soy-free mini chocolate chips
  1. Preheat oven to 350 and prepare your muffin tins with paper liners or butter.
  2. Mix together the pumpkin, eggs, melted butter or oil, and honey in a medium bowl.
  3. Mix together the almond flour, arrowroot, coconut flour, baking soda, sea salt and spices in a large bowl.
  4. Pour the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients and stir until well blended.
  5. Stir in the chocolate chips and divide the batter equally between the muffin cups.
  6. Bake for 22-25 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean.

 What is your favorite pumkin-flavored treat for fall? Share with us in the comments. Be sure to pin this recipe for later!

Homeopathy on Your Homestead

Homeopathy-on-Your-Homestead-Traditional-Cooking-School-GNOWFGLINS-main(This blog is featured in its entirety over at Traditional Cooking School by GNOWFGLINS where I also write monthly articles.)

What Is Homeopathy?


It isn’t herbal supplements, it isn’t vitamins, it isn’t magic.

Homeopathy, possibly the world’s fastest growing form of health care, is a form of medicine that has been part of the public healthcare systems of many nations and in use for over 200 years.

It was first used by physician Samuel Hahnemann when he became frustrated with the medical practices of his day (the late 1700s). He realized that things like bloodletting often did more harm than good, and gave up his medical practice to research and correct errors in medicine. He began reading and conducting studies on the principles of the Law of Similars.

At its simplest, homeopathy stimulates the body’s innate healing ability.

Read more….

Sweet Potato Spice Paleo Waffles

sweet potato waffle titlesThis blog is for informational purposes only. Some links may be monetized. Thank you for supporting Well Fed Family with your purchases.

The days are getting a little shorter. The air has that special quality that signals the end of one season transitioning into another. Suddenly I’m craving nutmeg and cinnamon, ginger and cloves – sweet potato pie? How about waffles that taste like sweet potato pie?!

These waffles are Paleo-style which means no grains. These waffles won’t give you a sugar rush (unless you spill the maple syrup – oops!) as they are full of protein, complex carbs and good fats. Make a double batch and freeze some for easy school-day breakfasts. Just pop them still frozen into the toaster for a few minutes.

If you don’t have pumpkin pie spice you can blend your own from 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 1/2 teaspoon ginger, 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg and 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves. Or for a fun flavor twist use Chinese Five Spice powder which is a blend of cinnamon, anise, clove, ginger and black pepper.

Top your waffles with plenty of butter if you can have dairy, and real maple syrup. Or for a more Paleo-style topping you can whip up some coconut cream and a little honey to make a fluffy topping.

Sweet Potato Spice Paleo Waffles


1 cup mashed cooked sweet potato

1 cup almond butter

2 eggs from hens raised on pasture

1 Tablespoon arrowroot powder (or equal amount of coconut flour)

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1/4 teaspoon sea salt

2 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice (or for a flavor twist use 1 1/2 teaspoons five-spice powder)

coconut oil for greasing the waffle iron


Preheat your waffle iron according to the directions. Place the almond butter into a mixer and use the whisk attachment to whip the almond butter for about one minute. This helps to give the waffles a lighter texture and makes it easier to mix in everything else. Add in the remaining ingredients and continue to use the whisk attachment to mix it all up. The batter will be somewhat thick. Bake the waffles according to the directions for your machine. My Belgian waffle maker uses about 1/2 cup batter for 3 minutes. Yield from my machine was five waffles.

Sweet Potato Spice Paleo Waffles
Recipe type: Paleo Breakfast
find the flavors of fall in the South with sweet potatoes, cinnamon and spices
  • 1 cup mashed cooked sweet potato
  • 1 cup almond butter
  • 2 eggs from hens raised on pasture
  • 1 Tablespoon arrowroot powder (or equal amount of coconut flour)
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • ¼ teaspoon sea salt
  • 2 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice (or 1½ teaspoons five spice powder)
  • coconut oil for greasing the waffle iron
  1. Preheat your waffle iron.
  2. Place the almond butter into the bowl of a mixer and use the whisk attachment to whip the almond butter for about one minute. This helps the texture of your waffles.
  3. Add the remaining ingredients (except coconut oil) and continue to whip until everything is blended.
  4. Bake according to your waffle iron's directions using the coconut oil to grease the iron.

 What is your favorite fall flavor? Have you ever tried sweet potato pie? Tell us about it in the comment section. And be sure to follow us on Facebook, Pinterest and Twitter for more recipes and healthy living articles.

Essential Oils in the Bible: Spikenard

essential oils in the bible spikenard 800

This post is for informational purposes only. Some links may be monetized. Thank you for supporting Well Fed Family with your purchases. 

How do you take medications? Pill, injection, inhaling, cream or ointment, or a patch are all common delivery systems for medications. They all, except for injection,  involved putting something into our mouth and digesting it, applying it to our skin, or breathing it into our lungs. Most people are careful with medications, but we should be just as careful with everything we put into or rub onto ourselves and our children. Our everyday personal care products can be sources of toxicity unless you make them yourself or choose wisely using something like Skin Deep.

This is why I love essential oils – they allow me to make personal care products that are actually healing, nourishing and uplifting. Which reminds me of something I learned during the Essential Oil Revolution summit, and then researched more in depth, about the essential oil spikenard which has been in use not only as a perfume but as medicine since ancient times.

Biblical application

In the Bible the book of John chapter 12 describes the beautiful and poignant event where Mary anoints the feet of Jesus with an entire pound of an extremely costly ointment of spikenard. John tells us she wiped his feet with her hair and the entire room was filled with the scent of the perfume.

Spikenard, in addition to being an expensive gift to give the Lord Jesus, had other amazing qualities giving even more worth to Mary’s gift. Spikenard has powerful relaxing properties and is commonly used to help those who are experiencing pain or loss. It helps to combat stress, reduce convulsions, give clarity to the mind and facilitate meditation. It is also anti-inflammatory and supports the cardiovascular system.

Dr. Josh Axe describes some key points of essential oil application on the body as being behind the ears, on the neck & abdomen, but also on the soles and tops of feet, as well as the upper back, the temples, and along spine. Mary’s anointing of Jesus’ feet was the perfect way to provide full the full benefit of her precious gift. It was also part of God’s perfect timing as this healing application came just prior to the very stressful period leading up to and including Christ’s crucifixion. Mary knew she loved her Lord and wanted to express her love with this costly gift, but she also blessed Him with the supporting properties of this ancient oil.

Use this oil at home

We can use essential oils at home to mediate stress and the stress reaction in our own bodies. Spikenard is part of the valerian family which is useful for relieving nervous tension, indigestion, and insomnia. Here are some ways to use spikenard at home:

  • add it to a fever-reducing cold compress
  • include it in homemade face creams to rejuvenate older skin
  • blend it into massage blends for sleep, relaxation and during trauma
  • massage the abdomen with it during menstruation
  • combine with lavender in a diffuser or inhaler for headaches and migraines

Be sure to use caution with spikenard as no more than 1% of any blend, also do not use in conjunction with homeopathic remedies as it may neutralize the remedy.

What are your favorite ways to use essential oils?



The Four Rs of Conservation: Reduce Reuse Recycle Rot

Four-Rs-of-Conservation-Traditional-Cooking-School-GNOWFGLINS-mainThis blog is part of my contribution to Traditional Cooking School

“Stewardship is foundationally understanding that we are not owners of things, but managers. It basically boils down to three major points:

1. God owns it all.
2. We are all stewards.
3. We have a responsibility to manage it for His glory.

If we understood these pieces, we would do things differently and everything would fall into place.”

–Chris Goulard, Pastor of Stewardship at Saddleback Church

“The care of the Earth is our most ancient and most worthy, and after all, our most pleasing responsibility. To cherish what remains of it and to foster its renewal is our only hope.”

–Wendell Berry

Eating local, eating real, and eating organic is a great start, but it’s just the start — on a long path to helping clean up our planet. Just like everything else, it’s a journey beginning at your own front door. Here are a few ideas to help you Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, and Rot in your own home, neighborhood, and town…Read More

How the Body Works: Heartburn, GERD and Natural Options

This blog is for informational purposes only. Some links may be monetized. Thank you for supporting Well Fed Family with your purchases. 

heartburn gerd titles 800

Fourteen years ago when I was pregnant with my daughter I had the worst heartburn of my entire life. Family Size bottles of antacid tablets lined my night table because the pain kept waking me up. Hindsight, as they say, is 20/20,  and I so wish I knew then what I know now!!

Strange as it sounds the most common cause of heartburn is not too much stomach acid, but too little! So many of the common Over The Counter remedies for heartburn are focused on reducing stomach acid, but the digestive tract NEEDS enough acid in order for all the parts to work well and efficiently digest your food. So it’s time for another installment of How the Body Works – I hope this explanation is clear and simple enough for even the kids to understand.

The Stomach Furnace

When you chew and swallow your food it travels down your esophagus and into your stomach. There is a little door, (technical name is the Lower Esophageal Sphincter  or LES), that is supposed to close tightly onto the top side of your stomach to keep everything contained. Think of your stomach like a big furnace and the LES like the heavy cast iron door keeping the raging fire inside the furnace and not outside. An efficient furnace operator keeps the door shut tight except when fuel is going in.  But if the furnace operator stops taking his job seriously and forgets to latch the door then it could swing open and sparks could fly out. If the operator falls asleep on the job and just leaves the door open he could find himself on fire! That’s what happens when you feel heartburn.

Having enough stomach acid, and not just weak acid but something strong enough, will act as the signal to the LES that it’s time to get the furnace door shut tight! When there isn’t enough acid or it isn’t acidic enough the LES is like the lazy furnace door operator and that is when heartburn happens. (Click here for a more detailed biological explanation.) Critical thinkers like you can figure out that when you take an antacid because you have heartburn you are just making the problem worse. The LES depends on the signal from the strong stomach acid to keep the door shut tight.

There is also another door at the other end of the stomach (this one is called the Pyloric Sphincter or PS) that also depends on strong stomach acid to do its job. It won’t open the door and let the food out unless the acid is strong enough. When we neutralize the stomach acid we could be trapping our food in our stomach instead of allowing it to continue through the rest of the digestive tract.

stomach alone with sphincter markers titles

By the way, stomach acid is concentrated hydrochloric acid. (The pH should be about 2.) If you put a few drops on your unprotected skin you’ll get burned. It has to be strong because it has to be able to break down anything you eat plus any bad stuff that might also be on your food like germs. It wouldn’t make any sense to expect a mild, weak acid to digest a nice juicy grassfed steak, or an entire bowl of kale salad….or a whole bag of extreme nacho chips, half a deep dish pizza or anything else you happen to eat! But our body is designed to handle the strong stuff. When the acid is too weak (stress, age, and digestive disorders can make it weak), or when we make it weaker with medications, that’s when we get into trouble.

A strong acid is also needed to signal the rest of the digestion team that it’s time to do their part. The PS opens and the acid jump-starts the duodenum to begin neutralizing the acid and releasing the rest of the enzymes from your liver, pancreas and gall bladder to finish breaking down your food so it can nourish your body.

Critical Thinking Time

Now it’s time to put on your Critical Thinking Caps. Here’s an excerpt from a medical book first published in 1956: “Indigestion and what is loosely called ‘heart burn’ (an irritation of the lower esophagus) are not caused by an ‘acid stomach.’ Acid is a natural and necessary part of the stomach’s digestive function, therefore, most ‘aids to digestion’ and ‘stomach sweeteners’ will do nothing to help and may do harm.” (underlining is mine)  So if it has been common medical knowledge for more than 50 years that antacids (stomach sweeteners) won’t help and could actually harm then why are they still the first choice for a solution?

Nexium, a proton pump inhibitor (PPI), is the #3 top selling prescription drug in the US with over 18 million prescriptions written in 2014 with $6.3 Billion in sales. How do PPIs work? According to the Nexium website “they work by turning off some of the ‘acid pumps’ in the stomach’s acid-producing cells, reducing the amount of acid in the stomach.”  (Emphasis added.)

Not only does the top Rx heartburn drug do exactly the opposite of what is biologically needed for successful operation of the LES and PS doors to our stomach furnace, but the people who use these drugs are using them for much, much longer, years longer, than they were developed to be used. (The studies done on these drugs did not go beyond 6-12 months) AND if that’s not enough there are serious risks associated with PPIs – serious enough that the FDA has published warnings – such as higher risk of bone fractureslow serum magnesium that can lead to heart rhythm problems, seizures and muscle spasms;  and an increased risk of c. diff overgrowth ( clostridium difficile is a pathogenic bacteria that can lead to severe diarrhea and other problems).

If you need one more reason not to take antacids then remember that the point of digestion is to break down the food you eat into easily absorbed nutrients. Without enough stomach acid the whole process of digestion doesn’t get off to the right start. It is the acid in the stomach that sends the message to the gate at the bottom of the stomach to open up and let everything continue, it is the acid in the stomach that digests protein (into amino acids which are the building blocks of our body). Without enough strong stomach acid eventually you end up with nutritional deficiencies – so even if you are eating totally organic, perfectly clean, real food all the time, but don’t have enough acid you can’t break down and digest it and so you will still be sick.

So what can you do instead of antacids?

First of all learn more about the signs of too little stomach acid with this simple article here from SCD Lifestyle.

1. Apple Cider Vinegar

The number one home remedy is apple cider vinegar.  Using a raw, unfiltered apple cider vinegar will give you the added bonus of extra enzymes which also help with digestion. For acute heartburn try 2 teaspoons of apple cider vinegar with 2 ounces (1/4 cup) of plain water. Drink this every five minutes until your symptoms begin to subside. As a daily maintenance you can drink a teaspoon or two in some water before each meal or once or twice a day as needed.

2. Drink lemon water

Lemon water a great tonic for all kinds of things, but the acidity of lemon juice and the natural enzymes from the raw lemon can help digestion.  Squeeze the juice from an entire lemon into your glass, or use a half of a lemon if the whole one is too much. Drink this before meals or as needed.

3. Betaine HCL

Supplementing with Betaine HCL, a supplemental form of the same acid that is naturally produced in your stomach, can strengthen your digestion. Before you try this remedy please check with your doctor because anyone taking Rx medications will need to make sure this supplement is safe for them. You can also read more about taking supplemental HCL here.

4. Try bitters

The bitter flavors naturally stimulate production of your own digestive enzymes. There are many types of bitters available, but one of my favorites is the one by Urban Moonshine. It tastes less medicinal than the more typical Swedish bitters.

5. Ginger Tea

Drink ginger tea between meals. I first learned about ginger tea from reading the GAPS diet book. If you suspect your heartburn is due to poor digestion then a healing diet like GAPS might be for you. To make ginger tea, grate some fresh ginger root (about a teaspoonful) into your teapot and pour 1/2 to 1cup boiling water over it, cover and leave for 3-5 minutes.  Pour through a small sieve and add honey to taste (optional).

6. Digestive enzymes and probiotics

These are good for helping boost the strength of your digestion and keeping your food moving through the entire digestive tract. Digestive enzymes are naturally produced by your body, but if your stomach acid is too weak they may need a little help, so taking supplemental digestive enzymes might be a good idea. The same goes for probiotics – so many lifestyle and dietary factors can deplete our natural beneficial bacteria and daily supplementation through probiotics or fermented foods can keep things running smoothly.

7. Get rid of stress

Stress does all sorts of yucky things, but as far as digestion goes stress can cause you to produce less stomach acid or weaker stomach acid. Ways to reduce stress before a meal include saying grace and being grateful, taking a deep calming breath, stopping to appreciate your meal visually and aromatically – all of these things can help digestive enzymes to start flowing.

What is your favorite home remedy for heartburn? Leave us a comment here to share it with us.

 Remember, this article is not meant to replace a doctor’s care or advice. Please make your own wise choices about health and wellness.