Explaining Antibiotic Resistance + Natural Alternatives That Work!

This is my latest article for Traditional Cooking School. Please stop by there and leave a comment or question!

Explaining-Antibiotic-Resistance-and-Natural-Alternatives-That-Work-Traditional-Cooking-School-GNOWFGLINS-main

In 1942, Anne Miller was dying of a streptococcal infection until, literally overnight, a single injection of an experimental drug saved her life.

The medical community predicted the elimination of all infectious diseases in the near future.

What was her miracle drug?

The first true antibiotic: penicillin.

Explaining Antibiotic Resistance

At that time, the entire world’s supply of antibiotics amounted to only 64 pounds. Today, over 60 million pounds of antibiotics are used in the United States each year. (Herbal Antibiotics, page 7.)

Additionally, much of the population now uses antibacterial soaps, hand sanitizers, and cleaners daily. And yet, this tidal wave of antibiotic use — and misuse — has not eliminated infectious disease, but rather kindled a new war against antibiotic-resistant superbugs.

The result?  Keep reading here…

six signs you need magnesium titles

Six Signs You May Need Magnesium

This blog is for informational purposes only. Some links may be monetized. Thank you for supporting Well Fed Family with your purchases. 

six signs you need magnesium titlesWhere Did the Trouble Begin?

A Senate report documented that we are growing our vegetables, grains and fruits in soils that are depleted of the necessary minerals needed to give us the correct balance of nutrients when we eat them. In fact they are so depleted that we are starving for these minerals no matter how much of these foods we eat. Laboratory tests proved the vegetables, eggs, grains and other foods we are eating are not as nutritious as they were generations ago. Scary? You haven’t heard it all….this report was written in 1936!

Six Signs You May Have a Deficiency

One of the most overlooked mineral deficiencies is magnesium.  It is estimated that as many as 80% of us are deficient in magnesium. How do you know if you are deficient? There are many symptoms, but these six are some of the most common according to Liz Lipski, nutritionist and author of Digestive Wellness.

  • Eyelids twitching
  • Muscles twitching
  • Menstrual cramps
  • Muscles very tense at the end of the day
  • Sleep disturbances
  • Sensitive to Noise

What Does Magnesium Do?

Carolyn Dean, author of The Magnesium Miracle, is probably one of the leading authorities on magnesium deficiency and nutrition.  She explains that magnesium is crucial to good health. It is responsible for hundreds of important processes in our body. It activates our muscles and nerves. It creates energy in our cells. It helps digest proteins, carbs and fats. It is a building block for our DNA as well as RNA. It is even part of the process that builds our “feel good” neurotransmitters like serotonin.

What About Calcium?

Everyone has heard about calcium. Lots of people take calcium supplements thinking they are helping their bones. What you may not know is that you need to supplement with equal amounts of magnesium! The two minerals work in balance with each other. In fact they work best in a synergistic balance of calcium, magnesium, vitamin D and vitamin K2. When these four nutrients are in a plentiful balance you will be helping care for your bones, heart, and the rest of your body!

Where Can You Find Magnesium?

Foods plentiful in magnesium include almonds, cashews, pumpkin seeds, sesame seeds, seaweed, dark green leafy vegetables, properly soaked and cooked black beans, avocado, wild caught seafood like salmon, and grassfed beef. Often people think whole grains are a good source of magnesium, but the anti-nutrients in whole grains actually deplete minerals from your body. This is why it is so important to soak, sprout or use sourdough leavening with all of your grains and breads. (For a detailed demonstration and recipes see our Breads DVD.) Juicing fresh vegetables is also a good way to get more of them into your diet.

Homemade bone broth is a great source of many important minerals and nutrients. Including broth in your meal helps you absorb even more of the nutrition from all your other foods! Find recipes here and here to make delicious bone broth at home.

What Depletes Magnesium?

Many prescription and OTC drugs deplete magnesium. The list includes, but isn’t limited to, Zantac, Nexium, Prilosec, Maalox, Tums, Alka-Seltzer, most antibiotics, blood pressure medications, Ritalin, steroid creams and inhalers, HRTs, and oral contraceptives. If you take any of these it would be wise to ask your doctor about a good magnesium supplement.

In addition to those medications, magnesium is also depleted by stress, caffeine, high amounts of calcium supplements, and very loud noises. Eating a diet high in processed foods and soft drinks, as well as having any kind of digestive disorder can also deplete your magnesium.

Also remember that foods treated with herbicides, especially glyphosate (RoundUP), will further deplete the minerals in the soil and in the food. So stick to organic whenever possible, or follow the Dirty Dozen guide when choosing fresh vegetables and fruits to find the ones with the least amount of toxic chemicals.

What About Supplements?

Magnesium glycinate is an easily absorbed form of magnesium that’s good for supplementing a deficiency. Be aware that magnesium has a laxative effect when you first begin taking supplements, so start slowly and work up to the most effective dose for you.

Mix up Natural Calm powder if you want to drink your magnesium. Take a bath with epsom salts, or use a high quality high mineral sea salt

Using magnesium oil spray or making a magnesium body butter are two more ways to add magnesium to your daily routine.

What are your favorite ways to get magnesium? Tell us about it in the comments or visit our Facebook page to share your thoughts.

 

 

ALN grain free

2015 Best of Alternative Living Network Grain Free Recipes

This blog is for informational purposes only. Some links may be monetized.

ALN grain freeAlternative Living Network

I am happy to be a part of Alternative Living Network, a network of Christian natural living bloggers. At the end of each year we like to give everyone an opportunity to feature their favorite blog articles on a wide range of topics. This year I’m sharing all of the favorite grain free recipes from ALN bloggers. Please visit these great blogs and give some of the recipes a try. And be sure to leave a comment that you found them on our 2015 BEST OF ALN post!

Grain Free Recipes

Savory Paleo Waffles with Chicken Gravy from yours truly at Well Fed Family

Blueberry Coffee Cake with Pecan Streusel topping also from Well Fed Family

Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Muffins from Well Fed Family

Grain Free Pumpkin Acorn Bread from Thyme To Embrace Herbs

Grain Free Lemon Basil Drop Biscuits from Thyme To Embrace Herbs

Grain Free Fluffy Pumpkin Basil Pancakes from Thyme To Embrace Herbs

Grain Free Melt in Your Mouth Lemon Balm Cookies from Thyme To Embrace Herbs

Grain Free Carrot Sage Muffins from Thyme To Embrace Herbs

Grain Free Lemon Basil Poppyseed Muffins from Thyme To Embrace Herbs

Grain Free To-Die-For Mint Brownies from Thyme To Embrace Herbs

Grain Free Chocolate Basil Cake from Thyme To Embrace Herbs

Grain Free Breakfast Biscuits with Rosemary from Thyme To Embrace Herbs

Grain Free Eggplant Parmesan from Simple Abundant Life

Simple Potato Egg Hash from Simple Abundant Life

Deliciously Simple Meatballs from The Pistachio Project

Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Coconut Flour Muffins from Nourishing Simplicity

Paleo Pumpkin Spice Bundt Cake from It Takes Time

Grain Free Sourdough Cereal from It Takes Time

Tell us what your favorite grain free recipes are! What would you like to see next year?

Leave a comment here or on the ALN Facebook page.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Christmas Ornament and Bible Lesson for the Littles plus Free Download to Share

christmas ornament and bible lesson titles

This blog is for informational purposes only. Some links may be monetized. Thank you for supporting Well Fed Family with your purchases.

For the last several years I have been privileged to be a part of a wonderful Sunday School program at Concord Street Church of Christ where our family worships. We have five different themed rooms and the K through 5th grade classes rotate through a different room each week hearing the lesson presented in five different ways. I love this approach as it speaks to the different learning styles we all have, and allows the kids to really understand and absorb the lessons before moving on to something new. One of my jobs has been to come up with recipes that complement the lessons – the children actually cook in the classroom as part of Sunday School! We have had so much fun and the kids have become more comfortable with the idea that they CAN cook as well as enjoy trying new things. In addition to food recipes we have also learned about essential oils, the importance of clean water, and how we can reach out to show Jesus’ love to our community.

Special Christmas Lesson and Ornament Craft

Here is a lesson you can read with your children or grandchildren that you don’t normally hear at Christmas, but since it’s about how Jesus loved everyone, even the unlovable people, it’s a great story to share! At the end gather three easy ingredients and have fun making ornaments together to hang on the tree and help remember how glad we are that Jesus came to Earth! At the end is a link for a .pdf you can download and print.

Jesus and Zacchaeus
Do you know what taxes are? It is money we have to pay to our government to help keep things running. Our taxes can do many things: pay for new roads, schools, public transportation, police, firemen, soldiers, and many, many other things.
Do you know what kinds of things we have to pay taxes on? We pay sales tax when we buy things at the store. We pay taxes on the money we earn at our jobs, or when someone gives us a large gift of money. If we buy or sell things online we pay taxes. There are even taxes when you win prizes for being on a tv game show. If you find treasure on a sunken pirate ship or buried treasure chest you still have to pay taxes on what it’s worth! Even people who win the Olympics or the Nobel Prize have to pay taxes on any money they win. Even if you rob a bank (which of course you wouldn’t want to do!) you are still supposed to pay taxes on the money you stole! So you can probably see why grown ups don’t like to pay taxes. It takes away some of the money that you feel like you have earned and have a right to keep.
This story is about a man whose job was a tax collector. Nowadays even though we don’t like to pay taxes we still don’t usually hate the person whose job it is to collect them, but back in Jesus’ day the tax collectors were often dishonest. They would collect more money than they were supposed to, and then keep the extra money for themselves.
Open your Bible to the New Testament and find the book of Luke, and look for chapter 19 verse 1.

1“Jesus entered Jericho and made his way through the town. 2 There was a man there named Zacchaeus. He was the chief tax collector in the region, and he had become very rich.”
You can tell by reading these first two verses that Zacchaeus was probably just like most of the other tax collectors in that he was not well liked by the people of Jericho because he had become very rich. People probably assumed he was keeping some of the tax money for himself. Now Jesus was traveling around to different places teaching, telling parables and performing miracles. The news about Jesus had spread all over the country, and it was common when Jesus arrived in a town for people to gather and see him. Zacchaeus had also heard about Jesus and wanted to see him, too. Read verses 3 & 4.
3 “He tried to get a look at Jesus, but he was too short to see over the crowd. 4 So he ran ahead and climbed a sycamore-fig tree beside the road, for Jesus was going to pass that way.”
Here we read that Zacchaeus was not very tall. Do you know the song about him? In the song we call him a “wee little man”. Even though he was short he was still an important person in Jericho. Can you imagine a grown-up you know climbing a tree? Can you picture your school principal or the mayor climbing a tree? It would seem strange to us, and it was probably strange back then to see the tax collector climbing a tree! But Zacchaeus didn’t seem to care. He was just interested in seeing Jesus. Let’s keep reading and see what happened next. Read verses 5&6.
5 “When Jesus came by, he looked up at Zacchaeus and called him by name. ‘Zacchaeus!’ he said, ‘Quick, come down! I must be a guest in your home today.’ 6 Zacchaeus quickly climbed down and took Jesus to his house in great excitement and joy.”
Wow – that is pretty amazing! Jesus knew Zacchaeus’ name without asking him first! Jesus also didn’t care that other people didn’t like Zacchaeus; he wanted to visit in his house. The Bible says Jesus said “I must be a guest…” which means that God had told him to do this, and so Jesus obeyed. All of this happened right in front of all the other people who were there to see Jesus. Zacchaeus was very happy about this! What do you think the other people thought? Read verse 7.
7 “But the people were displeased. ‘He has gone to be the guest of a notorious sinner’, they grumbled.”
I think it’s kind of funny that they called Zacchaeus a “notorious sinner” and grumbled that Jesus was spending time at his house. They didn’t understand that they were sinners, too. In fact we all make mistakes. In the book of Romans chapter 3 verse 23 it says that we are all sinners and we all fall short of God’s glorious standards. That’s one reason Jesus came to Earth. He came to help all of us learn how to be better people. I think Zacchaeus realized this too, because he quickly said something that surprised a lot of people. Read verse 8.
8 “Meanwhile, Zacchaeus stood before the Lord and said, ‘I will give half my wealth to the poor, Lord, and if I have cheated people on their taxes, I will give them back four times as much!’”
It looks like Zacchaeus had a change of heart. He realized that being rich at other people’s expense wasn’t the right thing to do. He also realized his money could be used to help other people. And he also wanted to show how sorry he was by paying back even more than he had taken. He said he would repay four times as much. It he took a dollar wrongly, he would repay $4! Do you think Jesus was happy about this? Let’s read the last two verses of this story. Read verses 9&10.
9 “Jesus responded, ‘Salvation has come to this home today, for this man has shown himself to be a true son of Abraham. 10 For the Son of Man came to seek and save those who are lost.’ “
Jesus forgave Zacchaeus his sins, and even if the other people in town didn’t like Zacchaeus, God loved him, forgave him, and knew that his heart was good. The very last verse is a good verse to memorize. This verse explains the whole reason why God sent Jesus to Earth. Jesus came to find those people who didn’t know God, who were lost in sin, and to show them who God is and to tell them the Good News of salvation!

Cinnamon Applesauce Ornaments
Use gingerbread man and Christmas tree cookie cutters to cut out Zacchaeus and tree ornaments using this recipe. Since you aren’t eating this dough, you can use the cheapest applesauce you can find. Find bulk-size ground cinnamon at warehouse stores or dollar stores. Use leftover dough to make more ornaments so that you can share with friends and family.

Ingredients
2 cups applesauce
2 cups ground cinnamon
1 Tablespoon craft glue such as Elmers

Preparation
Mix all of the ingredients together. Add more cinnamon if the dough seems too wet, or more applesauce if it is too dry. You may need to place the dough on a counter top and knead it several times to incorporate all of the ingredients and make a smooth dough.
Roll out the dough to about ¼” thick. Cut with cookie cutters, and place ornaments on a baking sheet. Use a toothpick or wooden skewer to open a hole in the top for a ribbon.
Let the ornaments dry on baking sheets overnight, or until completely dry. Alternately you can bake them in a 200 degree oven for 2 ½ hours.
Thread a ribbon through the hole and hang on the tree.
Well Fed Family, December 17, 2015
www.wellfedfamily.net

Click here for a free downloadable version of this lesson! Jesus and Zacchaeus

This Christmas spend some time with the little ones in your life and share with them this story about Jesus’ love, and let them create fragrant ornaments to hang on the tree and remind them of all they have learned.

 

Turkey Broth Instructions and Free Recipe to Share

turkey broth titlesThe big feast is over, the turkey is eaten, but there is still one more thing to do….Make Broth!! Here is a free printable and shareable set of instructions plus an easy recipe for Turkey and Rice soup.

turkey broth and recipe card

What will you make with your broth? Who will you share this recipe with? Tell us about it in the comments!

This blog is for informational purposes only. Some links may be monetized. Thank you for supporting us with your purchases.

 

5 ways to bless your family titles

5 Ways to Bless Your Family, Your Budget and Your Community

 This blog is for informational purposes. Some links may be monetized. Thank you for supporting Well Fed Family with your purchases. 

5 ways to bless your family titles

 

Take This Short Quiz

  1. What is the number one thing you can do as a family to improve your general health?
  1. What is a good way to connect with your teenagers?
  1. What is the most important thing the average person can do to make the American food system healthier and more sustainable?
  1. Name one thing can an individual do to become more self-sufficient and less dependent on a fluctuating, unstable economy?
  1. What activity can you do with young children to engage them in learning concepts in math and science even when they don’t usually enjoy those subjects?

The answers:

  1. cook 2. cook 3. cook 4. cook 5. cook

 Cooking vs Watching Cooking

Two people (both grandmothers!) in the last week have told me “I don’t cook!” Way too many people in my classes over the years have admitted they rarely or never cook. In fact Americans spend less time on average cooking each day than people in any other country! The average time spent cooking per day (not per meal, per DAY!) is 27 minutes – less time than it takes to watch The Next Food Network Star (what is up with this fascination of watching people cook? More people watch cooking than are actually doing cooking, and then when the show is over they still don’t have anything to eat!)

 It’s Healthier

Cooking at home is healthier. When you don’t cook you make yourself vulnerable to the big corporations who make all the ready-to-eat food you have to buy. Unless you spend big bucks to buy your meals from a local restaurant where the chef grows his own organic vegetables and carefully sources his ingredients from local farms, you are most likely eating a lot more refined sugar, industrial oils, and highly processed salt than you normally would if you cooked your own food. Corporations also use all kinds of chemical ingredients not available to the home cook. These chemical ingredients make their food last longer and look fresher than it actually is.

 Teens Like It

Cooking (and eating) together connects you as a family. Teens are social creatures, and they are also usually hungry creatures. :) Bringing them into the kitchen to prepare a meal is a way to get them to interact and be social with everyone who is involved in the meal preparation process. The shared experiences can build family bonds. Eating together a meal you have prepared gives a safe place for conversation, listening and sharing together.

 It Connects Us

Cooking connects you with your food and its origins. We were making homemade pizza as part of a Sunday school lesson and I had brought fresh oregano, parsley, and basil from my garden to use. One young 5th grade girl, already surprised that you could actually make a pizza, freaked out saying “why do you have weeds? How do you know those are safe to eat?” I said, “I grew these. They came from my garden. Where do you think food comes from?” and she replied, “I don’t know. The store has it.”

When we cook at home from fresh ingredients we are connecting in a small way to the rest of the community that grows and raises our food. We gain a new perspective on food when we see a list of raw ingredients get transformed into a meal. Growing something that you eat, or buying directly from a farmer, can bring even stronger connections. Real food doesn’t come in neat boxes, shrink wrapped for microwaving. Buying pre-prepared, pre-wrapped meals separates us from the reality of real food. Cooking at home from fresh ingredients creates more demand for real food while reducing the waste and high cost inherent in the processed food system.

 It’s Budget Friendly

Knowing how to cook gives you power over your budget. The illusion of the “value meal” keeps many people trapped eating expensive yet unhealthy food. Being able to cook for yourself means you can eat higher quality ingredients for less money. It means you can cook a little extra to freeze for later or to eat the next day for lunch instead of eating out. Knowing how to cook helps you be more frugal like when you use the bones for broth, leftover vegetables for soup, or freeze over ripe fruit for smoothies.

 It’s Educational

Teaching your children to cook opens up a new world for them. Measuring and counting, doubling a recipe, figuring out what makes bread rise, what makes pickles sour, seeing liquid cream transform into solid butter, comparing the taste of salt vs. sugar – all of this can bring math and science alive. Tactile experiences like kneading bread, cracking eggs, tearing lettuce, stirring batter, or chopping vegetables can be rewarding for busy little hands. And as your children grow and develop new skills in the kitchen you are giving them the gift of self-sufficiency for when they become adults.

Tell us your reasons for cooking! Leave a comment here or on our Facebook page!

6 Natural Strategies to Fight Off Flu Season

Ginger tea with lemon, honey, garlic for a healthy soothing detox drink

 

Flu season is here again…

And it will last from now through early spring.

An average year sees 5% to 20% of our population affected by the flu virus, depending on the severity of the year’s strain.

Influenza is caused by a highly contagious virus that typically infects us through the mucous membranes of the mouth, nose, or eyes. Exposure to the virus can be airborne from a cough or sneeze — or it can come from touching a contaminated surface, such as a doorknob or telephone, and then touching your nose or mouth.

Symptoms include a sudden onset of fever, aches, chills, and tiredness, and possibly a dry cough, sneezing, and sore throat.

If you find yourself sick with the flu, it’s important to know your enemy — the influenza virus — so you can defeat it.

Since it is a virus, not a bacteria, causing the infection, antibiotics won’t work.

Hygiene can play a major role in prevention since the virus spreads through coughing, sneezing, or touching an infected surface. However, antibacterial soap or gels won’t work!

Here are six strategies you can use at home ….[read more]

5 Kombucha Flavors {For Fall}

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It can be expensive to purchase, but it costs just pennies to make at home!

I’m talking about the tart and sweet, naturally effervescent and refreshing, immune-boosting drink we call Kombucha. It’s one of my family’s favorite beverages.

Here are five fun flavors to try this fall. Some are spicy and reminiscent of a delicious dessert, while others are fruity and tart…[read the rest of this post at Traditional Cooking School]

Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Muffins: grain-free with dairy-free option

This blog is for informational purposes only. Some links may be monetized. Thank you for supporting Well Fed Family with your purchases.

pumpkin chocolate chip muffin grain freeIt’s fall and time for all things pumpkin! We are eating far fewer grains right now because some in our family do better without them. But I needed a muffin that would also please the tastebuds of the others who don’t have to restrict grains. These muffins fit that requirement! They aren’t overly sweet, but the addition of chocolate chips gives a little burst of sweetness that goes well with the fall spices. Be sure to keep any leftovers in the refrigerator. For a dairy-free muffin use coconut oil or palm shortening in place of the butter.

Grain-free Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Muffins

1 cup canned pumpkin

3 eggs from pasture-raised hens

1/4 cup melted butter, or coconut oil

3 Tablespoons raw honey

1 1/4 cup almond flour

1/2 cup arrowroot flour

3 Tablespoons coconut flour

1 teaspoon aluminum-free baking soda

1/4 teaspoon sea salt

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon ground ginger

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg

1/8 teaspoon ground cloves

1/3 cup soy-free mini chocolate chips

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Prepare your muffin pan with muffin papers or butter.

Mix together the pumpkin, eggs, melted butter or oil, and the honey in a medium bowl. In a large bowl stir together the almond flour, arrowroot, coconut flour, baking soda, sea salt and the spices. Pour the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients and stir until well blended. Stir in the chocolate chips and divide the batter equally between the muffin cups. Bake for 22-25 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean.

Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Muffins: grain-free with dairy-free option
 
Author:
Recipe type: grain-free muffin
 
Spicy cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg and clove flavor this grain-free muffin perfect for the whole family. Chocolate chips give a nice twist on the traditional fall treat.
Ingredients
  • 1 cup canned pumpkin
  • 3 eggs from pastured hens
  • ¼ cup melted butter or coconut oil
  • 3 Tablespoons raw honey
  • 1¼ cups almond flour
  • ½ cup arrowroot flour
  • 3 Tablespoons coconut flour
  • 1 teaspoon aluminum-free baking soda
  • ¼ teaspoon sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon ground ginger
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg
  • ⅛ teaspoon ground cloves
  • ⅓ cup soy-free mini chocolate chips
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350 and prepare your muffin tins with paper liners or butter.
  2. Mix together the pumpkin, eggs, melted butter or oil, and honey in a medium bowl.
  3. Mix together the almond flour, arrowroot, coconut flour, baking soda, sea salt and spices in a large bowl.
  4. Pour the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients and stir until well blended.
  5. Stir in the chocolate chips and divide the batter equally between the muffin cups.
  6. Bake for 22-25 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean.

 What is your favorite pumkin-flavored treat for fall? Share with us in the comments. Be sure to pin this recipe for later!

Homeopathy on Your Homestead

Homeopathy-on-Your-Homestead-Traditional-Cooking-School-GNOWFGLINS-main(This blog is featured in its entirety over at Traditional Cooking School by GNOWFGLINS where I also write monthly articles.)

What Is Homeopathy?

Home-ee-AH-pathee.

It isn’t herbal supplements, it isn’t vitamins, it isn’t magic.

Homeopathy, possibly the world’s fastest growing form of health care, is a form of medicine that has been part of the public healthcare systems of many nations and in use for over 200 years.

It was first used by physician Samuel Hahnemann when he became frustrated with the medical practices of his day (the late 1700s). He realized that things like bloodletting often did more harm than good, and gave up his medical practice to research and correct errors in medicine. He began reading and conducting studies on the principles of the Law of Similars.

At its simplest, homeopathy stimulates the body’s innate healing ability.

Read more….